The Batterer as Parent: Addressing the Impact of Domestic Violence on Family Dynamics

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SAGE, 2002 - Social Science - 240 pages
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The Batterer as Parent takes the reader inside of homes affected by domestic violence, imparting an understanding of the atmosphere that battering men create for the children who live with them. Bancroft and Silverman show how partner abuse affects each relationship in a family, and explains how children's emotional recovery is inextricably linked to the healing and empowerment of their mothers. The authors cover the important but often-overlooked area of the post-separation parenting behaviors of men who batter, including their use of custody litigation as a tool of abuse. Readers also are guided in evaluating change in the parenting of men who batter, assessing risk to children from unsupervised visitation, and supporting the emotional recovery of children. Although the book is written primarily for professionals, its accessible style makes it engaging and useful for abused mothers and anyone else wishing to assist children exposed to battering.

 

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After reading this book, I felt like it explained my entire married life. Great insight and research. It should be a requirement for all family court judges, lawyers, custody evaluators, GALS, CYF caseworkers, reunification therapists etc.. Well written-Valette Clark

Contents

The Battering Problem
1
DEFINING BATTERERS
3
CHARACTERISTICS OF BATTERERS
5
MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT BATTERERS
19
SUMMARY
28
Power Parenting The Batterers Style With Children
29
EFFECTS ON CHILDREN OF EXPOSURE TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
37
CHILD ABUSE
42
SUMMARY
129
The Mismeasure of Batterers as Parents A Critique of Prevailing Theories of Assessment
130
INFLUENTIAL THEORIES OF DIVORCE
131
THE USE OF A DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TYPOLOGY TO ASSESS RISK TO CHILDREN
141
THE OVERLOOKED IMPLICATIONS OF JOHNSTON CAMPBELL AND ROSEBYS OWN OBSERVATIONS
147
SUMMARY
149
Supporting Recovery Assessing Risk to Children From Batterers and Structuring Visitation
150
SOURCES OF RISK TO CHILDREN FROM UNSUPERVISED CONTACT WITH BATTERERS
151

THE BATTERER AS ROLE MODEL
47
CHILDRENS OUTLOOK ON THE BATTERER
51
SUMMARY
52
Shock Waves The Batterers Impact on the Home
54
UNDERMINING OF THE MOTHERS AUTHORITY
57
EFFECTS ON MOTHERCHILD RELATIONSHIPS
64
USE OF CHILDREN AS WEAPONS AGAINST THE MOTHER
72
THE BATTERERS IMPACT ON OTHER ASPECTS OF FAMILY FUNCTIONING
77
RESILIENCE IN MOTHERCHILD AND IN SIBLING RELATIONSHIPS
81
SUMMARY
82
The Batterer as Incest Perpetrator
84
THE PREDATORY CHILD MOLESTER VERSUS THE INCEST PERPETRATOR
86
SHARED TACTICS OF BATTERERS AND INCEST PERPETRATORS
88
SHARED ATTITUDES OF BATTERERS AND INCEST PERPETRATORS
91
IMPLICATIONS OF THE OVERLAP FOR PROFESSIONAL RESPONSE
93
SEXUAL ABUSE ALLEGATIONS IN CUSTODY AND VISITATION DISPUTES
94
SUMMARY
97
Impeding Recovery The Batterer in Custody and Visitation Disputes
98
CREATING A CONTEXT FOR CHILDRENS HEALING
103
BATTERERS POSTSEPARATION CONDUCT WITH CHILDREN
105
BATTERERS MOTIVATIONS FOR SEEKING CUSTODY OR INCREASED VISITATION
113
BATTERERS ADVANTAGES IN CUSTODY DISPUTES
115
BATTERERS TACTICS IN CUSTODY AND VISITATION DISPUTES
122
EFFECTS ON CHILDREN OF CUSTODY LITIGATION
128
A GUIDE TO ASSESSING RISK TO CHILDREN FROM BATTERERS
156
STRUCTURING CUSTODY AND VISITATION
171
SUMMARY
177
Is It Real? Assessing and Fostering Change in Batterers as Parents
178
STEPS TO CHANGE IN BATTERERS
179
MISCONCEPTIONS REGARDING CHANGE IN BATTERERS
183
EVALUATING CHANGE IN BATTERERS AS PARENTS
184
CREATING A CONTEXT FOR CHANGE
185
SUMMARY
187
Improving Community Responses to the Parenting of Batterers
188
CHILD THERAPISTS FAMILY THERAPISTS AND PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN EXPOSED TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
191
CUSTODY EVALUATORS
197
FAMILY COURTS
200
AGENCIES AND COURTS WITH CHILD PROTECTIVE JURISDICTION
205
PARENT TRAINERS
207
PSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATORS
209
BATTERED WOMENS PROGRAMS
210
SUPERVISED VISITATION CENTERS
211
FAMILY LAWYERS AND BAR ASSOCIATIONS
212
SUMMARY
213
References
214
Index
230
About the Author
239
Copyright

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Page 229 - Protecting the Children In Custody: Disputes When One Parent Abuses the Other, CLEARINGHOUSE REVIEW, April 1996, at 1 1 13.

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About the author (2002)

Lundy Bancroft has spent over 17 years specializing in abusive men and also acts as a custody advisor. He is the author of "Why Does He Do That?" and "The Batterer as Parent," as well as articles in medical journals and professional books. The former co-director of Emerge, the nation's first counseling program for abusive men, he now practices in Massachuesetts while training various state and judicial agencies in working with domestic abuse.

Jay Silverman is Professor of Medicine and Global Public Health at the University of California at San Diego. He is a developmental psychologist with 20 years of experience in domestic violence, including direct counseling experience with hundreds of men who batter. He has led multiple, large-scale international and domestic research programs on issues of gender-based violence against women and girls; this work has resulted in more than 100 peer-reviewed studies. His research has included examinations of the social contextual influences on the etiology of male-perpetrated partner violence, the nature and health consequences of adolescent dating violence, history of child abuse among men who perpetrate partner violence, judicial behavior and the experiences of battered mothers in child custody cases, the role of partner violence in men?s transmission of HIV to their female partners, the nature and HIV risks associated with trafficking of women and girls for sexual exploitation, and the roles of partner violence in unintended and teen pregnancy, coercion regarding abortion, pregnancy loss, and infant and child morbidity and mortality .

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