Viola Olerich: The Famous Baby Scholar

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Laird & Lee, 1900 - Gifted children - 81 pages
 

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My name is Peggy Storms and viola was my mother-in-law. I am wondering how you got permission to put her book on your web page.

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Page 67 - I would not enter on my list of friends (Though graced with polished manners and fine sense Yet wanting sensibility) the man Who needlessly sets foot upon a worm.
Page 9 - Our chief object for adopting a child was to test, in a practical way, a new theory of education, which we believe to be much superior to any educational system which has heretofore been used. The wonderful success with which we have so far met must, we think, stand as evidence of its merit.
Page 33 - Council /;/ ._>'X /ow objects themselves brought before her. The committee estimated that she knew at least 500 more nouns which they could not present as objects or pictures, making a total of 3,000 nouns which she knew at this age — perhaps more nouns than the words of all parts of speech used by the average adult.
Page 33 - Viola was one year eleven months and twenty-five days old, she passed an examination before a disinterested committee of examiners (Miss Verna Lumpkin and Miss Martha Campbell, both competent and successful teachers of the public schools of Lake City, Iowa, the city in which we then resided,) who found that she knew 2,500 nouns by having either the pictures, or the objects themselves brought before her. The committee estimated that she knew at least 500 more nouns which they could not present as...
Page 15 - Viola with the utmost kindness and courtesy; have never even spoken a loud or harsh word to her. It is my opinion that every "bad boy" and every "bad girl" has been made bad by meddlesome interference. It has been said: "Spare the rod and spoil the child," but modern science, as well as common sense, is beginning to say: "Destroy the rod and refine the child.
Page 9 - She was a pale, an almost sickly-looking baby, with a mouth that was a little crooked, and the right side of her face considerably fuller than the left.
Page 36 - ... connection. When asked whether any child can learn as rapidly as Viola did the author says: Most people attribute most of the mental and moral differences which they see in children to heredity, but we can find no trustworthy evidence in support of this theory. We have the best grounds for believing that the faculties of all healthy children are at birth approximately equal and similar, at least as much so as two little oaks which are just appearing above the surface of the soil; but, after a...
Page 9 - No attempt was made to select a particular child; on the contrary, we desired to get an average child. Hence, physical health was the only point of pedigree which we regarded as of vital importance, and even of this we knew little or nothing.
Page 35 - ... eleven months and twenty-five days old. They found she knew about 2,500 nouns, which the author says is as many as the average adult uses of all parts of speech. Attention is called to Miss Shinn's letter in this connection. When asked whether any child can learn as rapidly as Viola did the author says: Most people attribute most of the mental and moral differences which they see in children to heredity, but we can find no trustworthy evidence in support of this theory. We have the best grounds...
Page 19 - ... in the English language. She could also read German nicely before she was three years old. At the age of three years and two months she read English, German, and French.

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