The American Indians: Their History, Condition and Prospects, from Original Notes and Manuscripts

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Derby, 1851 - Indian captivities - 495 pages
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Page 421 - Through an aperture which afforded me a view of the area of the fort I beheld, in shapes the foulest and most terrible, the ferocious triumphs of barbarian conquerors. The dead were scalped and mangled; the dying were writhing and shrieking under the unsatiated knife and tomahawk; and from the bodies of some, ripped open, their butchers were drinking the blood, scooped up in the hollow of joined hands and quaffed amid shouts of rage and victory.
Page 228 - Yea, though I walk in death's dark vale, Yet will I fear none ill : For Thou art with me ; and Thy rod And staff me comfort still.
Page 430 - Menehwehna, who had the command in this enterprise, gave me your promise that you would protect my friend, delivering him from all danger, and giving him safely to me. "The performance of this promise I now claim. I come not with empty hands to ask it. You...
Page 417 - Ducharme, and threatened to send the next person who should bring a story of the same kind, a prisoner, to Detroit. The garrison, at this time, consisted of ninety privates, two subalterns and the commandant ; and the English merchants at the fort were four in number. Thus strong, few entertained anxiety concerning the Indians, who had no weapons but small arms. Meanwhile, the Indians, from every quarter, were daily assembling, in unusual numbers, but with every appearance of friendship, frequenting...
Page 421 - I was. The garret was separated from the room below only by a layer of single boards, at once the flooring of the one and the ceiling of the other. I could therefore hear everything that passed; and the Indians no sooner came in than they inquired whether or not any Englishman were in the house.
Page 227 - The Lord's my shepherd, I'll not want. He makes me down to lie In pastures green: he leadeth me the quiet waters by.
Page 425 - I believed he meant to murder me, and that if so he might as well strike where I was as at any greater distance. He replied, with coolness, that my suspicions were just, and that he meant to pay me in this manner for my goods. At the same time he produced a knife, and held me in a position to receive the intended blow.
Page 460 - ... keeping at some distance. During this part of the ceremony they filled their pipes ; and now each blew the smoke toward the snake, who, as it appeared to me, really received it with pleasure. In a word, after remaining coiled, and receiving incense, for the space of half an hour, it stretched itself along the ground in visible good humor.
Page 399 - North winde finde a crannie, through which he can conveigh his cooling breath, they be warmer than our English houses...
Page 80 - He was now sure that he had come the right path, for the aged man had told him of this. There were also shining paddles. He immediately entered the canoe, and took the paddles in his hands, when to his joy and surprise, on turning round, he beheld the object of his search in another canoe, exactly its counterpart in everything.

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