Hooker's Journal of Botany and Kew Garden Miscellany, Volume 9

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Sir William Jackson Hooker
Reeve, Benham, and Reeve, 1857 - Botany
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Page 175 - Some idea of the appearance of this plant may be gained by imagining a vast number of Ananas, or Pine-apple plants, without fruit, so thickly crowded together as to cover the sides, and even the middle, of the stream, standing seldom higher than three or four feet above the surface, but generally under water, whenever the river swells above its ordinary height. The stems which support them are of the thickness of a man's arm; black, and of a very tough and spongy substance; generally simple, though...
Page 124 - Index filicum; a synopsis, with characters, of the genera, and an enumeration of the species of ferns, with synonymes, references, &c.
Page 26 - The great objects are the improvement of indigenous products, the introduction of exotics, the supply of these to the hills and plains when acclimatised, and the exhibition to the people of an improved system of cultivation in practical and successful operation.
Page 149 - Kew Journal.) Mode of Drying Succulent Plant*. — M. Motley, in writing from Borneo, states, that he believes he has hit on the right way of drying succulent plants, and such as are apt to come to pieces. He had previously tried hot water, but that made the specimens mould ; then a hot iron, but that was tedious, and it spoiled the flower; pricking the leaves with a penknife or fork was of use, but the specimens looked unsightly after it ; and chloride of calcium was too troublesome. He now puts...
Page 231 - Their route was then along the right bank of that river to the junction of the Suttor River, which was followed up to the Beylando. Tracing that river to lat. 22, they then pursued a south-east course to the junction of the Comet and Mackenzie Rivers, whence their course to the Dawson brought them, on Nov.
Page 175 - ... than three or four feet above the surface, but generally under water, whenever the river swells above its ordinary height. The stems which support them are of the thickness of a man's arm; black, and of a very tough and spongy substance; generally simple, though not rarely divided into one or two branches. They rise up from the bottom, not often in an upright posture, but inclined by the force of the current. They have very much the growth of Dragon-trees (DractBnd), or of some palms, from which...
Page 267 - Baekea utilis. from Mount Aberdeen, might serve travellers in those desolate localities as tea ; for the volatile oil of its leaves resembles greatly in taste and odour that of lemons, not without a pleasant, peculiar aroma.
Page 108 - In passing along, we came to a place where we found several women manufacturing turmeric (from the rhizome of a species of Curcuma) , and upon the sides of the river were large quantities of refuse. In a small house close to the water there were two pits, 18 inches deep, lined with Bavaria leaves, and made water-tight; also a number of posts set into the ground, having rough bark, to be used as graters. When a quantity of the rhizome is grated, it is committed to the pits, where it remains for some...
Page 125 - Prodromus ; or, an enumeration of South African indigenous plants used as remedies by the colonists of the Cape of Good Hope.
Page 231 - S. lat., 127 30' E. long. On the 21st of June Mr. Gregory left the encampment on the Victoria River, accompanied by six persons. The arid nature of the country compelled them to increase the latitude to 15 S., after which they kept parallel to the coast as far inland as water could be found in the rivers, the greatest distance from the sea not exceeding 100 miles. Proceeding thus they reached the Albert River, Aug.

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