The Geography and History of Vermont

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C.W. Willard, 1871 - Vermont
 

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Page 247 - ... no part of the property of any individual can with justice be taken from him or applied to public uses without his own consent or that of the representative body of the people.
Page 246 - Every person is entitled to a certain remedy in the laws for all injuries, or wrongs which he may receive in his person, property, or character ; he ought to obtain justice freely, and without being obliged to purchase it, completely and without denial, promptly and without delay, conformably to the laws.
Page 246 - ... therefore no male person born in this country, or brought from over sea, ought to be holden by law to serve any person as a servant, slave or apprentice, after he arrives to the age of twenty-one years, nor female in like manner, after she arrives to the age of eighteen years, unless they are bound by their own consent, after they arrive to such age, or bound by law for the payment of debts, damages, fines, costs, or the like.
Page 257 - ... but the articles to be amended, and the amendments proposed, and such articles as are proposed to be added or abolished, shall be promulgated at least six months before the day appointed for the election of such convention, for the previous consideration of the people, that they may have an opportunity of instructing their delegates on the subject.
Page 234 - The United States shall guaranty to every State in this Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion, and on application of the legislature, or of the executive, (when the legislature cannot be convened,) against domestic violence.
Page 246 - That government is, or ought to be instituted for the common benefit, protection, and security of the people, nation, or community...
Page 247 - That, in all capital or criminal prosecutions, a man hath a right to demand the cause and nature of his accusation, to be confronted with the accusers and witnesses, to call for evidence in his favor, and to a speedy trial by an impartial jury of his vicinage, without whose unanimous consent he cannot be found guilty...
Page 253 - As every freeman, to preserve his independence (if without a sufficient estate), ought to have some profession, calling, trade or farm, whereby he may honestly subsist, there can be no necessity for nor use in establishing offices of profit, the usual effects of which are dependence and servility, unbecoming freemen...
Page 256 - Legislature the repealing such laws as appear to them to have been enacted contrary to the principles of the Constitution. These powers they shall continue to have for and during the space of one year from the day of their election, and no longer.
Page 246 - ... protection and security of the people, nation or community, and not for the particular emolument or advantage of any single man, family or set of men who are a part only of that community, and that the community hath an indubitable, unalienable and indefeasible right to reform, alter or abolish government in such manner as shall be by that community judged most conducive to the public weal.

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