Papers Relating to the Application of the Principle of Dyarchy to the Government of India: To which are Appended the Report of the Joint Select Committee and the Government of India Act, 1919

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Clarendon Press, 1920 - Constitutional law - 606 pages
 

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Contents

Village unions
31
II
38
Treatment of this subject in the problem of the Commonwealth 77
77
Misrepresentation in Indian reviews 78 Respect for Indian suscepti
83
British affairs 85 Indias choice between the two 85 Representation
89
LETTER TO THE HON BABU BHUPENDRA NATH
96
Reasons for defining goal 102 Federalized countries to be imitated
103
Otherwise it will block progress of electoral govern
108
Need for vertical as well as horizontal divisions 108 Each province must
119
Appended criticisms 124 Prefatory note
125
training should begin in village and other local bodies 133 Conclusions
134
tions Indianization of services Commissions for Indians 140 Imperial
140
Imperial civil service suggested 145 Definition of sphere of central
148
Elementary education recommended for transfer 154 Importance
155
Must be protected by sufficient representation 161 Difficulty of pro
163
Immediate reform of Indian legislature desired 167
167
Views of Malcolm and Munro 170 Intemperance of British opinion after
173
Low political moral Inefficiency Shortcomings of zamin
179
Not acceptable to Indian opinion 184 Administrative structure
185
The ballot
192
From a teacher 195 Imperial reform disapproved 195
195
IV
201
Supervisory functions 205 Relations of services to departments
208
Provincial settlements 209 Fixed assignments 211 How estimates
216
Parganas villages and relative officials 219 District
223
revenues The octroi 232 Their functions 233 Note by an officer
238
LAND REVENUE 239290
239
Its origin according to Manu 240 Reforms of Akbar 242 Question
248
Lack of contact between officials and people in Bengal 255 Inade
258
and tax 263 Reasons for rent theory 264 Importance of retaining
267
Famine remissions 269 Lightness of government demand
274
revenue summarized 280 Conclusions deduced 281 Taxation burden
284
Assemblies and their functions 337 Creation
341
Composition of central legislature 344 Standing civil service commission
344
LETTERS TO THE PEOPLE OF INDIA ON RESPON
350
British officials since 1858 Ambiguities of selfgovernment 357
357
by the Congress and Loague 359 Answer of Imperial Government
363
cannot be trained by schoolteaching 368 Education without responsi
369
Meaning of control discussed 374 Positive as well as negative control
376
executive and legislature 380 How effected in England 380
382
Lowell on the cases of Jamaica and Malta 384 Indian
390
Choice between Europe and America as models for India 395 Dominion
397
Overcentralization in United Kingdom Prance and Italy 402 Origin
403
The case of Orissa 407 Sind Marathas Canarese Tamil and Telugu
410
local and political government distinguished 416 The London County
417
superiority of autocratic decisions really superficial 423 Basic reasons
424
In the end character produces efficiency 425 Though efficiency
430
tion to dyarchy by Nationalists 432 By Europeans 433
438
desired by landholders 443Reasons against conceding this demand
444
Chief Commissioners duties in sphere of reserved powers 448
448
Government attitude to social reform criticized 454 Enabling legislation
457
Suspensory power 463 Periodic commissions of inquiry 463
463
Methods adopted 469 Origin of joint address 469 Reason for English
474
Its effect on our position at the Peace Conference 476 Pledges as
481
Question 1 482 Importance of affirming authority of Parliament
482
Elected members should control transferred powers
489
The Joint Address 491 The question of areas used as basis of attack
497
to their constituents only criticized 499 Confusion of ideas underlying
509
Safeguards to suspensory power 515 Uovornors should
515
must be commensurate to duties 518 Resjonsibility of executive
522
Cornwall Lewis on the danger of mock parliaments 529
529
transferred subjects and elect its own speaker 533 President of legis
539
Direct election advised 545 Council of state not even popular
545

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Page 573 - The policy of His Majesty's Government, with which the Government of India are in complete accord, is that of the increasing association of Indians in every branch of the administration and the gradual development of self-governing institutions with a view to the progressive realisation of responsible government in India as an integral part of the British Empire.
Page 556 - WHEREAS it is the declared policy of Parliament to provide for the increasing association of Indians in every branch of Indian administration, and for the gradual development of selfgoverning institutions, with a view to the progressive realisation of responsible government in British India as an integral part of the empire...
Page 473 - The British Government and the Government of India, on whom the responsibility lies for the welfare and advancement of the Indian peoples, must be judges of the time and measure of each advance, and they must be guided by the co-operation received from those upon whom new opportunities of service will thus be conferred and by the extent to which it is found that confidence can be reposed in their sense of responsibility.
Page 593 - Any rules relating to transferred subjects made under this section shall be laid before both Houses of Parliament as soon as may be after they are made...
Page 362 - I would add that progress in this policy can only be achieved by successive stages. The British Government and the Government of India, on whom the responsibility lies for the welfare and advancement of the Indian peoples, must be judges of the time and measure of each advance...
Page 596 - Act, and if an address is presented to His Majesty by either House of Parliament within the next subsequent twenty-one days on which that House has sat...
Page 326 - Majesty's Government, with which the Government of India are in complete accord, is that of the increasing association of Indians in every branch of the administration, and the gradual development of self-governing institutions, with a view to the progressive realization of responsible government in India as an integral part of the British Empire. They have decided that substantial steps in this direction should be taken as soon as possible...
Page 596 - State containing such directions as aforesaid shall be laid before both Houses of Parliament as soon as may be after they are made. 13. In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires —
Page 575 - The presidencies of Fort William in Bengal, Fort St. George, and Bombay, and the provinces known as the United Provinces, the Punjab, Bihar and Orissa, the Central Provinces, and Assam, shall each be governed, in relation to reserved subjects, by a governor in council, and in relation to transferred subjects (save as otherwise provided by this Act) by the governor acting with ministers appointed under this Act.
Page 581 - No proposal for the appropriation of any revenue or moneys for any purpose shall be made except on the recommendation of the Governor-General.

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