Old Myths-modern Empires: Power, Language, and Identity in J.M. Coetzee's Work

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Peter Lang, 2005 - Literary Criticism - 314 pages
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This study gives substantial coverage and close critical attention to a wide range of Coetzee's published writings, in the attempt to situate his oeuvre within the framework of both postmodernist and postcolonial theory and criticism. In addition, it links the political and social aspects of Coetzee's work, its South African provenance and its often oblique engagement with contemporary issues, with formal questions regarding structure, rhetoric and narrative strategies as tackled in his novels. By approaching Coetzee's fiction from a variety of critical angles and taking into account both the transformations in the socio-political context of South Africa, and the recent changes in critical reception (exemplified by the Nobel Prize he was awarded in 2003) this book therefore offers a thorough assessment of the author's oeuvre.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgements
9
The Work of J M Coetzee Thematic Linguistic
23
Introduction to Section 1
61
The Representation of the Natives
67
Coetzees Critique of Liberal Humanism
93
Replicas of Empire
123
Introduction to Section 2
157
The Struggle for Recognition
163
The Search for Identity
201
Introduction to Section 3
219
Deconstruction and the Politics of South Africa
251
Final Ambiguities
273
Works Cited
285
Index
313
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About the author (2005)

The Author: Michela Canepari-Labib was born in Italy and educated at the University of Pavia (Italy) where she studied English and French Literature and at the University of Sussex (UK) where she obtained a Master's degree in Critical Theory and a Ph.D. in English Literature. She was recently awarded a scholarship from the Scuola Superiore di Studi Umanistici directed by Umberto Eco at the University of Bologna. She is the author of Word-Worlds, a study of Christine Brooke-Rose's work (Peter Lang, 2002). She teaches English at the Universities of Parma and Milan (Italy).

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