Democracy After Liberalism: Pragmatism and Deliberative Politics

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Psychology Press, 2005 - Political Science - 162 pages
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Can a democratic society propose an account of its practices and institutions that is at once adequately robust to answer antidemocrats and sufficiently inclusive to ein the assent of citizens who disagree about philosophical, moral, and religious essentials? A robust theory will draw upon controversial philosophical premises, and will thereby fail to respect the deep plurism characteristic of a free society. Anything less than a robust philosophical theory, however, will raise questions of why anyone should prefer democracy to mild oligarchy or peaceful tyranny. In Democracy After Liberalism, Robert B. Talisse critically evaluates liberalism, the dominant attempt in the tradition of political philosophy to provide a philosophical foundation for democracy. Combining recent work on deliberative democracy with C. S. Peirce's pragmatism, Talisse argues for an epistemic conception of deliberative democracy to meet this need. Although the resulting view is not liberal, it eschews the problems confronting communitarianism by insisting that the formative role of the state is epistemological rather than moral.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
What Liberalism Is
15
Tension in Liberal Theory
33
Three Liberal Responses
55
The Deliberative Turn in Democratic Theory
77
A Pragmatist Conception of Deliberative Democracy
97
Toward a Deliberative Culture
123
Endnotes
143
Works Cited
151
Index
159
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About the author (2005)

Robert Talisse is Assistant Professor of PHilosophy at Vanderbilt University. He has written several books including On Dewey (2000), On Rawls (2001) and On James (2004). He is also the co-editor of the forthcoming American Philosophy: An Encyclopedia (Routledge).

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