Construction of Masonry Dams

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McGraw-Hill book Company, Incorporated, 1915 - Dams - 279 pages
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Page 233 - ... Engineer of the Aqueduct Commissioners. They were modified as the work progressed. The construction was carried on under his supervision until January 1, 1900; then under Mr. William R. Hill until October 14, 1903; Mr. J. Waldo Smith until August 1, 1905; and Mr. Walter H. Sears until completion. The cost of the dam, not including engineering, land and legal expenses, was $6,886,872. Even this provision was not adequate to the growing needs of the City, and two more sources were added in 1908...
Page 114 - ... amount of leakage continued until February 7th, when it suddenly increased, indicating that there was a free passage for water through the dam section at the cracks. On February 10th, a measurement showed a leakage of 6.6 gal. per min., and by February 17th, this had increased to 23.9 gal. per min., which is the maximum amount of leakage measured at any time. As soon as the marked increase in leakage was noticed, steps were taken to control it. This was accomplished by caulking the crack at the...
Page 114 - ... for practically a year. This was done in order to eliminate, if possible, the effect of the heat generated during setting, and heretofore referred to. The results shown in this table were then plotted on the diagram, Fig. 3, and by trial a curve most closely representing the observations was drawn. If R be the total range in temperature at any point in the mass, in degrees, Fahrenheit, and D be the distance in feet to the nearest face of the dam, then 135 where 135 is the total atmospheric range,...
Page 226 - SHOWING CAPITAL COSTS OF PRODUCER GAS PLANTS INSTALLED AND ANNUAL COSTS OF POWER PER BRAKE HORSE-POWER. NOTE : Annual costs include: interest at 5 per cent., depreciation and repairs on plant, oil and waste, labor and fuel (Bituminous coat at $4.00 and Anthracite coal at $5.00 per ton).
Page 91 - Where this class of masonry joins with granite dimension stone masonry the courses must correspond, and the joining with arches and other dimension stone masonry must be accurate and workmanlike. Each course to be composed of two stretchers and one header alternately, the stretchers not to be less than 3 feet long nor more than 7 feet long, and the headers of each successive course to alternate approximately in vertical position.
Page 114 - I in. No leakage or seepage through the dam or through the cracks was noticed until January 16th, 1908. On this date the water stood at a point 53 ft. below the top of the dam, and the leakage was noticed at a distance of 70 ft. from the top of the dam. Fig. 1, Plate XCV, shows the crack at Station 14 -|- 89, which extends through a header block. A slight amount of leakage continued until February 7th, when it suddenly increased, indicating that there was a free passage for water through the dam...
Page 48 - ... that a uniform pathological process goes on after experimental lesions. After a lesion of a nervetrunk, a process of degeneration sets in at the point of injury, and involves a small portion of the central end and the entire peripheral part of the nerve, from the seat of injury onward. This process may be more or less complete, and may, or may not, be followed by a second process of regeneration in the diseased nerve. It is necessary to distinguish between the degenerative and regenerative processes...
Page 113 - Show that this position of equilibrium is impassible if c> ^l. 10. A uniform rod of weight W rests with its lower end on a rough horizontal floor and with its upper end against a rough vertical wall. The rod is in a vertical plane at right angles to the line of intersection of the floor and the wall. The coefficient of friction at each of the two contacts is /*. Show that the angle a made by the rod with the vertical when it is just on the point of slipping is 2 tan"1 p. The rod, remaining in the...
Page 114 - ... On this date the water stood at a point 5-3 ft. below the top of the dam, and the leakage was noticed at a distance of 70 ft. from the top of the dam. Fig. 1, Plate XCV, shows the crack at Station 14 + 89, which extends through a header block. A slight amount of leakage continued until February 7th, when it suddenly increased, indicating that there was a free passage for water through the dam section at the cracks. On February 10th, a measurement showed a leakage of 6.6 gal. per min., and by...
Page 114 - ... being provided at the end of each section. The first temperature cracks in the main dam were noticed early in October, 1907, and were four in number, located at Stations 10 + 46, 11 + 08, 12 + 73, and 14 + 89, as shown on Plate XCTV. By March 1st, 1908, three of these cracks could be traced down the face of the dam for a distance of 70 ft., and the fourth for a distance of about 42 ft. from the top. There was no indication of any horizontal cracking, except at points where the cracks for short...

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