The History of England from the Earliest Period to the Death of Elizabeth: The history of England: reigns of Edward the Sixth-Mary-and Elizabeth. In two volumes

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, 1835 - Great Britain
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Page 129 - English court for the examination of this great cause were, the Duke of Norfolk, the Earl of Sussex, and Sir Ralph Sadler ; and York was named as the place of conference.
Page 551 - I used the best words I could to persuade her from this melancholy humour ; but I found by her it was too deep rooted in her heart, and hardly to be removed. This was upon a Saturday night, and she gave command that the great closet should be prepared for her to go to chapel the next morning.
Page 78 - ... deep grief and sorrow : nor does it seem possible to make her forget the same. Still she repeats these words,
Page 427 - Of onely her he sung, he thought, he writ. Her, and but her, of love he worthie deemed; For all the rest but litle he esteemed.
Page 554 - ... beholders. Then the good man told her plainly what she was, and what she was to come to ; and though she had been long a great Queen here upon earth, yet shortly she was to yield an account of her stewardship to the King of Kings.
Page 424 - Love my memory, cherish my friends; their faith to me may assure you they are honest. But above all, govern your will and affections, by the will and Word of your Creator; in me, beholding the end of this world, with all her vanities.
Page 469 - ... twelve days; and in her discourse she fetched not so few as forty or fifty great sighs. I was grieved at the first to see her in this plight, for in all my lifetime before I never knew her fetch a sigh, but when the Queen of Scots was beheaded. Then, upon my knowledge, she shed many tears and sighs, manifesting her innocence that she never gave consent to the death of that Queen.
Page 469 - I would you knew — though not felt — the extreme dolour that overwhelms my mind, for that miserable accident which, far contrary to my meaning, hath befallen.
Page 453 - I tell you, are set on stages, in the sight and view of all the world duly observed. The eyes of many behold our actions; a spot is soon spied in our garments, a blemish quickly noted in our doings. It behoveth us, therefore, to be careful that our proceedings be just and honorable.
Page 521 - Parma ; for with the grace of God, if we live, I doubt it not but ere it be long so to handle the matter with the Duke of Sidonia as he shall wish himself at St. Mary Port among his orange trees.

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