An Essay Upon Projects

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pubOne info LLC, Sep 15, 2010 - Literary Criticism - 200 pages
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pubOne.info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition. Defoe's -Essay on Projects- was the first volume he published, and no great writer ever published a first book more characteristic in expression of his tone of thought. It is practical in the highest degree, while running over with fresh speculation that seeks everywhere the well-being of society by growth of material and moral power. There is a wonderful fertility of mind, and almost whimsical precision of detail, with good sense and good humour to form the groundwork of a happy English style. Defoe in this book ran again and again into sound suggestions that first came to be realised long after he was dead. Upon one subject, indeed, the education of women, we have only just now caught him up. Defoe wrote the book in 1692 or 1693, when his age was a year or two over thirty, and he published it in 1697.
 

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Contents

AUTHORS PREFACE
AUTHORS INTRODUCTION
THE HISTORY OF PROJECTS
OF PROJECTORS
OF BANKS
OF THE MULTIPLICITY OF BANKS
OF THE HIGHWAYS
OF ASSURANCES
OF WAGERING
OF FOOLS
A CHARITYLOTTERY
OF BANKRUPTS
A COURT OF INQUIRIES
OF ACADEMIES
OF A COURT MERCHANT
OF SEAMEN

OF FRIENDLY SOCIETIES
OF SEAMEN
THE CONCLUSION
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Daniel Defoe was born Daniel Foe in London, England on September 13, 1660. He changed his surname in 1703, adding the more genteel "De" before his own name to suggest a higher social standing. He was a novelist, journalist, and political agent. His writings covered a wide range of topics. His novels include Robinson Crusoe, Moll Flanders, Roxana, Captain Singleton, and Colonel Jack. He wrote A Tour Thro' the Whole Island of Great Britain, which is an important source of English economic life, and ghost stories including A True Relation of the Apparition of One Mrs. Veal. He also wrote satirical poems and pamphlets and edited a newspaper. He was imprisoned and pilloried for his controversial work, The Shortest Way with the Dissenters, which suggested that all non-Conformist ministers be hanged. He died on April 24, 1731.

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