Slavery in Africa: Historical and Anthropological Perspectives

Front Cover
Suzanne Miers, Igor Kopytoff
Univ of Wisconsin Press, 1979 - History - 474 pages
This collection of sixteen short papers, together with a complex and very much longer introductory essay by the editors on "African 'Slavery' as an Institution of Marginality," constitutes an impressive attempt by anthropologists and historians to explore, describe, and analyze some of the various kinds of human bondage within a number of precolonial African societies. It is important to note that in spite of the precolonial emphasis of the volume, all of the essays are based at least partly on anthropological or ethnohistorical field research carried out since 1959. All but one have been augmented greatly by more conventional historical research in published as well as archival sources. And although the volume's focus is upon the structures and conditions of servitude within the several African societies described, many of the essays illustrate, and some discuss, the conceptual as well as the practical difficulties of separating the institutions and customs of "domestic" African slavery from those of the European dominated commercial slave trade in which many of the societies participated. -- from JSTOR http://www.jstor.org (May 24, 2013).
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

African Slavery as an Institution of Marginality
3
The Societies Discussed in This Volume
4
THE SLAVE AS INSTITUTIONALIZED OUTSIDER
83
Margiland
86
VARIATIONS IN THE USES OF SLAVES
103
Peoples of the Zambesi Region ca 17501850
106
Sena Society 107 The Acquisition of Akaporo 107 Social
119
Igbo Country
122
Transcending the Slave Status 196 Con
201
Mbundu and Neighboring Peoples in the Late Nineteenth Century
206
The Mbanza Manteke Region of Zaire
236
THE HISTORICAL DYNAMICS OF SLAVE SYSTEMS
259
The Kerebe and Their Neighbors
262
The Vai and Their Neighbors
288
Northern Part of Cameroon Coast
306
Servitude among the Wolof and Sereer of Senegambia
335

The Ethnographic Area 123 The Sociopolitical Organization
132
The Lower Niger
134
Slavery and the Evolution of NineteenthCentury Damagaram
155
The Character of Slavery in Damagaram 158 Procurement
169
Damagaram at the End of the Nineteenth Century 156
174
Slaves and the State 169 Conclusions 172 Glossary
175
SLAVERY IN THE STRUCTURE OF DESCENT GROUPS
179
Sherbro Area
182
X
184
Sherbro Social and Political Structure 184 The Concept
188
Ways of Becoming a Slave in the Nineteenth
194
Precolonial Senegambia Showing Wolof and Sercer Areas
336
THE ECOLOGY OF SERVILITY IN MULTIETHNIC SETTINGS
365
Tawana Expansion ca 18471906
368
Ngamiland before the BaTawana 371 Social Relationships
380
Batlhanka Recruitment 382 The Status
388
Territory of the Tuareg of the Central Sudan Nineteenth Century
392
SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION UNDER COLONIAL RULE
413
Sierra Leone in 1912
430
Borgou and Northern Benin
436
Index
461
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1979)

Suzanne Mierswas, at the time this book was published, Direction of the African Studies Program and professor of history at Ohio University, and the author of Britain and the Ending of the Slave Trade (1975). Igor Kopytoff was then associate professor of anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, and is the author of numerous articles concerning African peoples, particularly those of Zare.

Bibliographic information