final report on the revision of settlement of the sirsa district

Front Cover
1883
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Colonisation of the Prairie round Abohar 52
52
Changes in the Demand
53
Increase of Cesses since the Regular Settlement
55
Paras Subjects Pages 178 Rabi Harvest 1888 271
58
Remissions since the Regular Settlement
59
Net Collections from the Land since the Regular Settlement Revenue Cesses and Takkavi
60
Coercive Processes
61
The Restoration of Order
63
The Attitude of the People
64
History from 1857 to 1863Drought of 186661
66
Drought of 186869 and great loss of Cattle
67
History from 1869 to 1872Gradual Accumulation of Arrears
68
Good Harvests and large Collections of 187273
69
History from 1876 to 1879Drought of 187778
71
Bumper Harvests of 188182 and 188283 and prosperous condi tion of the District
72
CHAPTER III
73
Growth of Population and Rate of Increase
75
Immigration from Neighbouring Tracts
76
Increase of Population and Cultivation in different parts of the District
77
Density of Population in different parts of the District
78
The Tribes arranged in order of numbers
79
The number of Villages owned by each Tribe
80
The social position of each Tribe
81
The Jats and Rajputs
83
Different sections of Jats
84
TheSikhJats
85
The Hindu Rajputs
86
The Musalman Jats and Rajputs
87
Clans of Musalman Jats and Rajputs
89
Clans of Bagri Jats
91
The Bodlas and Chishtis
95
The Rains
97
Other Musalmans
98
The Brahmans and Faqirs
99
The Banyas Aroras and other Mercantile Classes
100
The Kumhars
103
TheKharis
104
The Lohars
105
The Chamars and other workers in Leather
106
TheChuhras
107
The Machhi and allied Castes
108
The Chhimba Teli Nai Mirasi and allied Castes
109
The Bawariyas
110
The Aheris the Mahtams and other Low Castes Ill 99 The Caste System in Sirsa
118
The Dialects spoken in the Sirsi District
120
Characters used in writing
124
LiteratureVerses and Proverbs
125
Education
126
Muhammadanism in Sirsa
128
The Sikh Religion
134
The Bishnoi Religion
136
The Religion of the Jains Ascetics and Low Castes
139
Places of Pilgrimage
141
Fasts and Festivals
143
Superstitions Omens and Charms
144
Age and Conjugal Condition
146
Disparity of the Sexes
149
Health Infirmities and Insanity
150
Food and Drink
152
Dress and Ornaments
155
Houses and Furniture
157
Family Life and Etiquette
159
Domestic Ceremonies at Birth Betrothal Marriage and Death
162
Tribal Custom
173
The Villages
176
The Village Menials and Village Organisation
180
Labourers and Wages
184
Occupations
185
Trade and Carriage
187
Communications
188
Course of Trade
190
Rates of Interest and Exchange
191
Kanin Rori and Ellenabad
193
Abohar
194
Fazilka Town
195
Distribution of Population
197
Measures of Time
198
Measures of Length
199
Measures of Area
201
Measures of Weight
202
Measures of Capacity
203
Games and Amusements
204
Crime
207
Civil Litigation
209
CHAPTER IV
212
Cultivated Areas
213
Increase of Cultivation
214
Classes of Soil
216
Irrigation from wells in the Nail and Utar Chaks
217
Irrigation from wells in the Hitar
219
Crops grown on Lands flooded by the Satlaj
238
Prospects of Irrigation in the Dry Tracts
239
Uncertainty of the Rainfall
241
Nature of the Rainfall in past years
245
Crops grown on Unirrigated Lands
247
Agriculture Implements and Operations
250
Use of Manure and deterioration of Soil
253
Causes reducing the outturn of Crops
254
Mode of observation of Harvests
256
Kharif Harvest 1880
260
Rabi Harvest 1881
264
Kharif Harvest 1881
266
Rabi Harvest 1882
268
of years
276
Account of the different Kharff Crops
280
Account of the different Rabi Crops
283
Estimated average Gross Produce of each Crop
287
History of Prices
288
Estimated average Prices of Grain and Fodder
291
Estimated average Value of Gross Produce
292
The uncultivated Area
293
Enumeration of Live Stock in 1880
295
Sirea Bullock Fair 206
296
Bullocks
298
Cows
299
Produce and Price of Ghi
300
Cattlebreeding in Sirsa
302
Camels
304
Horses and Donkeys 806
306
Sheep and Goats 8i8
308
Other Domestic AnimalsPloughs
309
Miscellaneous Produce 3ln 205 Total Annual Produce
310
CHAPTER V
311
Names of Villages
315
Right of the State under Native Rule
318
Right of the State under early British Rule
319
Rights of the Individual Cultivators as between themselves
321
The Principles of the First Regular Settlement
324
The Limitation of the Right of the State 824
325
The Division of the Cultivators into Proprietors and Tenants
327
The Grant of Rights of Occupancy to the Tenants 829
331
The Record of the Regular Settlement
335
Paras Subjects Pages 224 Abandonment of Rights of Occupancy 885
337
225 Importance of the Tenant Class in Sirs
338
The effect of the Panjab Tenancy Act of 1868 889
345
Rent in kind
347
Cash Rents
351
Sales and MortgagesRise in the value of rights in Land
358
Gradual Definition of Rights 856
359
The Settlement Survey
360
The List of Holdings 868
363
The Size of Holdings
364
The Effect of the Regular Settlement 882
366
The Partition of the Land 334
368
The Distribution of the Assessment 871
371
The Progress of Partitions
373
Extension of cultivation by Tenants
374
Continuance of the Struggle between the Proprietors and Tenants
375
Questions regarding Land formerly held with Right of Occupancy 876
379
Determination of the Rents of Tenants with Rights of Occupancy
381
Defeat of the Tenants as regards Land broken up since Settlement 881
387
Grant of Occupancy Rights to the Tenants 887
390
The Orders carried out 891
391
The Effects of the Orders 893
393
The Sukhlambari Grants 894
395
Bights of the Grantees against other Proprietors
397
Arrangements regarding the lands of Absentee Grantees
399
Rights in land affected by Alluvion and Diluvion
400
Record of Local Customs
402
Kharif Harvest 1882 270
403
Rights to Fuel Minerals c
404
Irrigation Rights
405
Rights to Drinking Water
407
Rights in the Village Site
409
Common Expenses and Common Burdens of the Village
410
Boads and Land acquired for Public Purposes
412
Village Officials
413
CHAPTER VI
417
The Nali
427
Summary of Results for the whole District
456
Ditto of Fluctuating Assessment on the Ghaggar
462
The HitarFluctuating Assessment introduced
468
Ditto Method of working the system
476
Ditto Working of the System hitherto
482
CHAPTER VII
488
The Settlement Record
494
The Record of Statistics
500
The Superior Revenue Staff
506
Tendency towards Separation of Rights 414

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 138 - They observe the Holi in a different way from other Hindus. After sunset on that day they fast till the next forenoon, when, after hearing read the account of how Prahlad was tortured by his infidel father...
Page 414 - Officer on the principles above indicated, revenue rates on soils may be deduced therefrom, and the proposed gross assessment, together with the proposed revenue rates, must be reported to the Government for preliminary sanction, and will, when sanctioned by the Local Government, form the basis of assessment of particular estates in the circle; but, in the .assessment to be ultimately adopted, full consideration must be given to the special circumstances of each estate.
Page 133 - ... times also, in season and out of season. Notwithstanding all the numerous saints and deities whom he endeavours to propitiate, he has a vague belief that above all there is one Supreme God whom he calls Narayan [Narayana] or Parmeshar [Paramesvara], who knows all things and by whom all things were made, and who will reward the good and punish the bad both in this life and in the life to come.
Page xlviii - Honor the Lieutenant-Governor is pleased, with the previous sanction of the Governor-General in Council, to issue the following Notification of Settlement, in accordance with the provisions of Section 11 of the Punjab Land Revenue Act, 1871 : — 1. — The local area, which is hereby put under Settlement, consists of the Jenlam District.
Page 15 - Secretary to the Government of India in the Department of Revenue and Agriculture.
Page 324 - ... headmen, in whose names the previous leases had been made out, were declared to have the proprietary right in all the land of the township, and the other cultivators were declared to hold under them as tenants. But in villages managed on the bhaiachara system all the cultivators shared the proprietary...
Page 138 - Their clothing is the same as of other Bagris, except that their women do not allow the waist to be seen, and are fond of wearing black woollen clothing. They are more particular about ceremonial purity than ordinary Hindus are, and it is a common saying that if a Bishnoi's food is on the first of a string of twenty camels, and a man of another caste touches the last camel of the string, the Bishnoi would consider his food defiled and throw it away.
Page 171 - ... forbid a man to marry in his mother's clan or village, or even in his grandmother's clan. A girl is a valuable piece of property, and betrothal 'is a contract by which the girl's family bind themselves, often for a money consideration, to transfer the ownership nf the girl to the boy's family on his reaching a marriageable age.
Page 136 - Jhambaji again showed his power by lighting a lamp by simply snapping his fingers, and uttered his first word. He then adopted the life of a teacher, and went to reside on a sandhill, some thirty miles south of Bikaner, where after 51 years he died and was buried, instead of being burnt, b'ke an ordinary Hindu.
Page 414 - Officer will take into consideration all circumstances direetiy or indirectly bearing upon the assessment, such as rent rates, where money rates exist, the habits and character of the people, the proximity of marts for the disposal of produce, facilities of communication, the incidence of past assessments, the existence of profits from grazing, and the like. These and other considerations must be allowed their weight.

Bibliographic information