Blackout Girl: Growing Up and Drying Out in America

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Hazelden Publishing, Jun 3, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 280 pages
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Jennifer Storm's Blackout Girl is a can't-tear-yourself-away look at teenage addiction and redemption. At age six, Jennifer Storm was stealing sips of her mother's cocktails. By age 13, she was binge drinking and well on her way to regular cocaine and LSD use. Her young life was awash in alcohol, drugs, and the trauma of rape. She anesthetized herself to many of the harsh realities of her young life--including her own misunderstandings about her sexual orientation--, which made her even more vulnerable to victimization. Blackout Girl is Storm's tender and gritty memoir, revealing the depths of her addiction and her eventual path to a life of accomplishment and joy.
 

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Blackout Girl
Awesome read. Could relate on so many levels. One of the best books I have read about one's dealings with addiction and recovery. Would definitely read again. Jennifer's honesty was indeed truly breathtaking.

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Contents

Tracing Scars
1
First Beer First Blackout
3
Being Judged
13
Normal Relatively
19
Valentines and Dirty Dancing
31
Hurting Myself
43
Dealing with Divorce
55
First Roach
59
Crying in a Clinic
125
Opportunity in Maryland
133
Attempting Recovery
143
Losing My Mother
153
Living High Hitting a Low
167
Driving to Detox
183
Feeling a Flicker of Warmth
193
Dumping Shit on the Paper Pile
203

Losing Alex
67
Mourning Alex
75
Blackouts Bulimia and Burials
83
Unhappy New Years Eve
97
Addicted Before Exhaling
103
Credits and Demerits
111
Evolving Relationships
117
Learning to Lean
209
Living Halfway and Beyond
219
Revisiting Lee
231
Dealing Today
241
Resources
247
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Jennifer Storm is the executive director of the Victim/Witness Assistance Program in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. In 2002, Governor Edward G. Rendell appointed Storm as a commissioner to the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency. Her media appearances include frequent live and taped interviews on all major networks as a spokesperson for victims' rights. She has been profiled and appeared in We, Women, Central Penn Business Journal, Rolling Stone, Time, and many local and statewide newspapers.

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