Bulletin of the United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories, Volume 3

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1877 - Geological surveys
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Page 65 - It is nearly square, and comprises about 5,000 acres ; two-thirds of it but a few feet above tide water, the other third mountainous and several hundred feet high. The Skokomish is the only river which, coming from the north in the Olympic range of mountains, flows east on the south side of the reservation and north on the east side, when it empties into Hood's Canal. There are several sloughs running from the river to the canal across the reservation. Geological environment, both stratigraphical...
Page 7 - ... authorities at Washington elicited additional details used in the publication mentioned and many more since its issue. After exhibition of the copy to a number of military and civil officers connected with the Departments of War and of the Interior, it appeared that those who, from service on expeditions and surveys or from special study of American ethnology, were most familiar with the Indian tribes west of the Mississippi, had never heard of this or any other similar attempt among them to...
Page 113 - ... places his hands on some part of the body and draws forth, or says he does, the evil spirit, and when he says he has it he holds it between his hands, invisible, and blows it up or takes it to another man who throws a stone at it and kills it.
Page 821 - A remarkable feature of the genus is displayed in the mandibles. Each of these is compound in the region usually composed of the simple dentary bone. It there consists of three parallel elements — an internal and an external, embracing a median element. The inner bears a band of teeth en brosse on its inner and superior aspects, and the external a few teeth of similar character on its superior edge.
Page 15 - in which the geese lay eggs." As the appearance of raccoons after hibernation, the causes inducing inflamed eyes, and oviposition by geese vary with the meteorological character of each year, and as the twelve lunations reckoned do not bring back the point in the season when...
Page 8 - Cle"meut, a half-breed interpreter, living at Little Bend, near Fort Sully, Dakota, who professed to have obtained information concerning the chart from personal inquiries of many Indians, and whose dictated translation of them, reduced to writing in his own words, forms the basis of that given in the present paper. The genuineness of the document was verified by separate examination, through another interpreter, of the most intelligent Indians accessible at Fort Rice, and at a considerable distance...
Page 548 - ... twelve thirteen fourteen fifteen sixteen seventeen eighteen nineteen twenty thirty forty fifty sixty seventy eighty ninety one hundred two hundred three hundred four hundred five hundred...
Page 93 - If he guesses right, he wins and plays next; but if his conjecture is incorrect, he loses, and the other side continues to play. The two rows of players are 10 or 12 feet apart. Generally they have six or more sets of these blocks, so that if, as they suppose, luck does not attend one set they can try another. These different sets are marked on the edges to distinguish them from other sets. Another way of distinguishing them is by having them of slightly different sizes. They are made very smooth...
Page 16 - IF the red slayer think he slays, Or if the slain think he is slain, They know not well the subtle ways I keep, and pass, and turn again. Far or forgot to me is near; Shadow and sunlight are the same; The vanished gods to me appear; And one to me are shame and fame. They reckon ill who leave me out; When me they fly, I am the wings; I am the doubter and the doubt, And...
Page 18 - ... put forth the charm of woven paces and of waving hands", utter wild cries, and muddle in blood and much filth until they work themselves into an epileptic condition. Their incantations are not only to drive away disease, but for many other purposes, such as to...

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