On Stories: And Other Essays on Literature

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Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 180 pages
38 Reviews
"In life and art both, as it seems to me, we are always trying to catch in our net of successive moments something that is not successive . . . But I think it is sometimes done--or very, very nearly done--in stories."

C.S. Lewis is widely known for his fiction, especially his stories of science fiction and fantasy, for which he was a pioneering author in an age of realistic fiction. InOn Stories, he lays out his theories and philosophy on fiction over the course of nine essays, including "On Stories," "The Death of Words," and "On Three Ways of Writing for Children." In addition to these essays,On Storiescollects eleven pieces of Lewis's writing that were unpublished during his lifetime. Along with discussing his own fiction, Lewis reviewed and critiqued works by many of his famous peers, including George Orwell, Charles Williams, Rider Haggard, and his good friend J.R.R. Tolkien, providing a wide-ranging look at what fiction means and how to craft it from one of the masters of his day.

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Review: On Stories: And Other Essays on Literature

User Review  - Mary Catelli - Goodreads

A collection of essays. All on literature in some way. There's reviews, and discussions of individual authors. (He doesn't review Orwell, for instance; he writes an essay comparing Animal Farm and ... Read full review

Review: On Stories: And Other Essays on Literature

User Review  - Goodreads

A collection of essays. All on literature in some way. There's reviews, and discussions of individual authors. (He doesn't review Orwell, for instance; he writes an essay comparing Animal Farm and ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

C. S. (Clive Staples) Lewis (1898-1963), one of the great writers of the twentieth century, also continues to be one of our most influential Christian thinkers. A Fellow and tutor at Oxford until 1954, he spent the rest of his career as Chair of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge. He wrote more than thirty books, both popular and scholarly, inlcuding The Chronicles of Narnia series, The Screwtape Letters , The Four Loves , Mere Christianity and Surprised by Joy .

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