Natal, Its Early History, Rise, Progress and Future Prospects as a Field for Emigration

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Trübner & Company, 1882 - KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa) - 227 pages
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Page 205 - Governor, and for the use of Her Majesty's Military Officers serving on Full Pay in this Colony ; and also for the use of the...
Page 16 - There are also wild cherries (strand karsau) with long stalks, and very sour. Finally, they have a kind of apple, not unpleasant eating, but which are not ripe until they fall from the tree ; before they fall, they are nauseous (walgingh) and cause flatulency. The country swarms with cows, calves, oxen, steers and goats — there are few sheep, but no want of elephants...
Page 204 - Spirits, or strong water, of all sorts, not sweetened, not exceeding the strength of proof by Sykes' hydrometer, and so on in proportion for any greater strength...
Page 177 - The holder of such certificate provided for in this act, shall cause the same to be registered in the office of the clerk of courts of the county wherein he or she resides.
Page 15 - Natal are two forests, each fully a mjl square, with tall, straight, and thick trees, fit for house or ship timber; in which is abundance of honey and wax: but no wax is to be had from the natives, as they eat the wax as well as the honey. " In all the time of their stay in that country, or...
Page 74 - I observe as a physiological, or perhaps, psychological, fact, that the attraction of alcohol for itself is cumulative. That so long as it is present in a human body, even in small quantities, the longing for it, the sense of requirement for it, is present, and that as the amount of it insidiously increases, so does the desire.
Page 205 - Government) with the view of establishing and maintaining telegraphic communications with places beyond the sea; horses and other beasts and provisions and stores of every description imported for the use of Her Majesty's land and sea forces...
Page 133 - And it is our further will and pleasure that you do to the utmost of your power promote Religion and Education among the Native Inhabitants of our Said Territory or of the lands and islands thereto adjoining and that you do especially take care to protect them in their persons and in the free enjoyment of their possessions and that you do by all lawful means prevent and restrain all violence and injustice which may in any manner be practised or attempted against them...
Page 133 - The Governor is, to the utmost of his power, to promote religion and education among the native inhabitants of the Protectorate, and he is especially to take care to protect them in their persons and in the free enjoyment of their possessions. and by all lawful means to prevent and restrain all violence and injustice which may in any manner be practiced or attempted against them.
Page 6 - ... any act, neglect, or default whatsoever of the pilot, master, or mariners...

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