General Sheridan

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D. Appleton, 1895 - Generals - 332 pages
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Page 197 - SHERIDAN'S RIDE. Up from the south at break of day, Bringing to Winchester fresh dismay, The affrighted air with a shudder bore, Like a herald in haste to the chieftain's door, The terrible grumble and rumble and roar, Telling the battle was on once more, And Sheridan twenty miles away. And wider still those billows of war Thundered along the horizon's bar ; And louder yet into Winchester rolled The roar of that red sea uncontrolled, Making the blood of the listener cold, As he thought of the stake...
Page 197 - Sheridan twenty miles away. But there is a road from Winchester town, A good, broad highway leading down; And there, through the flush of the morning light, A steed as black as the steeds of night Was seen to pass, as with eagle flight; As if he knew the terrible need, He stretched away with his utmost speed; Hills rose and fell; but his heart was gay, With Sheridan fifteen miles away.
Page 197 - Under his spurning feet, the road Like an arrowy Alpine river flowed ; And the landscape sped away behind Like an ocean flying before the wind ; And the steed, like a bark fed with furnace ire, Swept on with his wild eyes full of fire : But, lo ! he is nearing his heart's desire — He is snuffing the smoke of the roaring fray, With Sheridan only five miles away...
Page 198 - Temple of Fame, There with the glorious general's name Be it said, in letters both bold and bright : Here is the steed that saved the day By carrying Sheridan into the fight, From Winchester, — twenty miles away!
Page 337 - America in which we live, it has been the author's purpose to describe the dress, the occupations, the amusements, the literary canons of the times ; to note the changes of manners and morals...
Page 197 - And the wave of retreat checked its course there, because The sight of the master compelled it to pause. With foam and with dust the black charger was...
Page 142 - In pushing up the Shenandoah Valley, where it is expected you will have to go first or last, it is desirable that nothing should be left to invite the enemy to return. Take all provisions, forage, and stock wanted for the use of your command ; such as cannot be consumed, destroy.
Page 197 - Swept on, with his wild eyes full of fire. But lo ! he is nearing his heart's desire ; He is snuffing the smoke of the roaring fray, With Sheridan only five miles away. The first that the General saw were the groups Of stragglers, and then the retreating troops ; What was done? what to do? a glance told him both. Then, striking his spurs, with...
Page 339 - REAR-GUARD OF THE REVOLUTION. By JAMES R. GILMORE (Edmund Kirke). With Portrait of John Sevier, and Map. I2mo. Cloth, $1.50. " The Rear-Guard of the Revolution " is a narrative of the adventures of the pioneers that first crossed the Alleghanies and settled in what is now Tennessee, under the leadership of two remarkable men, James Robertson and John Sevier. The title of the book is derived from the fact that a body of hardy...
Page 340 - These memoirs, by the private secretary of Napoleon, are a valuable and important contribution to the history of the Napoleonic period, and necessarily they throw new and interesting light on the personality and real sentiments of the emperor. If Napoleon anywhere took off the mask, it was in the seclusion of his private cabinet. The memoirs have been republished almost as they were written, by Baron de MenevaTs grandson, with the addition of some supplementary documents.

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