Sea and Sardinia

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Penguin Books, 1999 - Drama - 213 pages
2 Reviews
An intriguing account of Sicilian life that reveals as much about the writer as the place, people, and customs it describes
Written after the First World War when he was living in Sicily, Sea and Sardinia records Lawrence's journey to Sardinia and back in January 1921. It reveals his delighted response to a new landscape and people and his uncanny ability to transmute the spirit of place into literary art. Like his other travel writings the book is also a shrewd inquiry into the political and social values of an era which saw the rise of communism and fascism. This edition restores censored pasages and corrects corrupt textual readings to reveal the book Lawrence himself called "a marvel of veracity."
For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust theseries to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-datetranslations by award-winning translators."

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User Review  - Asperula - LibraryThing

I was looking for a good description of life in Sardinia in the early 1900's and DH Lawrence was my surprise go to person. He and his wife took a very rustic short tour through the island and the ... Read full review

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Translating Baudelaire
Clive Scott
No preview available - 2000
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About the author (1999)

David Herbert Lawrence (1885–1930) was born in the mining village of Eastwood, near Nottingham, England. His father was an uneducated miner; his mother, a former schoolteacher. Lawrence began his first novel, The White Peacock (1911), while attending Nottingham University. In 1912, he ran away with Frieda von Richthofen, the wife of one of his professors. They were married in 1914. Suffering from tuberculosis, Lawrence was in constant flight from his ill health, traveling through Europe and around the world by way of Australia and Mexico, settling for a while in Taos, New Mexico. Lawrence and Frieda returned to Europe in 1925. Among his more than forty volumes of fiction, poetry, drama, criticism, philosophy, and travel writing are Sons and Lovers (1913), The Rainbow (1915), Women in Love (1920), Studies in Classic American Literature (1923), The Plumed Serpent (1926), and Lady Chatterley’s Lover (1928).

Daphne Merkin is an essayist, novelist and literary critic. She is a contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine and Elle, and she writes for Slate, Book Forum, and many other publications.

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