Sea and Sardinia

Front Cover
Penguin Books, 1999 - Drama - 213 pages
8 Reviews
"In January 1921, D. H. Lawrence and his wife Frieda visited Sardinia. Although the trip lasted only nine days, Lawrence wrote an intriguing account of Sardinian life that not only evokes the place, people and local customs but is also deeply revealing about the writer himself."--BOOK JACKET. "Remarkable for its metaphoric and symbolic descriptions, the book is transfused with the author's anger and joy. His prejudices and his political prophecies make Sea and Sardinia a unique and dynamic piece of travel writing."--BOOK JACKET. "The Cambridge edition restores censored passages and corrects corrupt textual readings to reveal for the first time the book Lawrence himself called "A marvel of veracity.""--BOOK JACKET.

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Review: Sea and Sardinia

User Review  - Goodreads

Not the most compelling narrative as far as travel writing goes. Lawrence's writing is fantastic, and he makes some very interesting observations about the people and politics of Sardinia. But he has a tendency to ramble and repeat himself quite a bit, which made it a very slow read. Read full review

Review: Sea and Sardinia

User Review  - Goodreads

As novelist Russell Banks has said recently, "it's all Lawrence all the time, no Sardinia." Read full review

References to this book

Translating Baudelaire
Clive Scott
No preview available - 2000
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About the author (1999)

David Herbert Lawrence (1885-1930) was born into a miner's family in Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, the fourth of five children. He attended Beauvale Board School and Nottingham High School, and trained as an elementary schoolteacher at Nottingham University College. He taught in Croydon from 1908. His first novel, The White Peacock, was published in 1911, just a few weeks after the death of his mother, to whom he had been extraordinarily close. His career as a schoolteacher was ended by serious illness at the end of 1911.

In 1912 Lawrence went to Germany with Frieda Weekley, the German wife of the Professor of Modern Languages at University College, Nottingham. They were married on their return to England in 1914. Lawrence had published Sons and Lovers in 1913; but The Rainbow, completed in 1915, was suppressed, and for three years he could not find a publisher for Women in Love, completed in 1917.

After the war, Lawrence lived abroad and sought a more fulfilling mode of life than he had so far experienced. With Frieda he lived in Italy, Sri Lanka, Australia, New Mexico and Mexico. They returned to Europe in 1925, settling in Italy again, where he finished Lady Chatterley's Lover. This, his last novel, was published in 1928, but did not appear in its complete form in England and America for thirty years. The tuberculosis which ha

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