History of Philosophy

Front Cover
Image Books, 1993 - Philosophy - 521 pages
55 Reviews
Conceived originally as a serious presentation of the development of philosophy for Catholic seminary students, Frederick Copleston's nine-volume A History Of Philosophy has journeyed far beyond the modest purpose of its author to universal acclaim as the best history of philosophy in English.

Copleston, an Oxford Jesuit of immense erudition who once tangled with A. J. Ayer in a fabled debate about the existence of God and the possibility of metaphysics, knew that seminary students were fed a woefully inadequate diet of theses and proofs, and that their familiarity with most of history's great thinkers was reduced to simplistic caricatures. Copleston set out to redress the wrong by writing a complete history of Western philosophy, one crackling with incident and intellectual excitement -- and one that gives full place to each thinker, presenting his thought in a beautifully rounded manner and showing his links to those who went before and to those who came after him.

The result of Copleston's prodigious labors is a history of philosophy that is unlikely ever to be surpassed. Thought magazine summed up the general agreement among scholars and students alike when it reviewed Copleston's A History of Philosophy as "broad-minded and objective, comprehensive and scholarly, unified and well proportioned... We cannot recommend [it] too highly."
 

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Review: A History of Philosophy 1: Greece and Rome (A History of Philosophy #1)

User Review  - Pmacdougald - Goodreads

Should honestly take some more time to give a more substantive review, but here is a quick-hitter. Copleston, as everyone is fond of mentioning, is extremely erudite, and writes generally in a lucid ... Read full review

Review: A History of Philosophy 1: Greece and Rome (A History of Philosophy #1)

User Review  - James F - Goodreads

Returning to reading philosophy as a "project", I decided to begin with Copleston's history. This was recommended background/reference material for my college History of Philosophy classes back in ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Part I
13
Early Ionian Philosophers
22
The Pythagorean Society
29
The Word of Heraclitus
38
The One op Parmenides and Melissus
47
The Dialectic of Zeno
54
Empedocles of Akragas
61
The Metaphysics of Aristotle
287
Philosophy of Nature and Psychology
320
Aristotles Ethics
332
Politics
341
Aesthetics of Aristotle
359
Note on the Older Peripatetics
369
Plato and Aristotle
372
Part V
379

The Advance of Anaxagoras
66
The Atomists
72
PreSocratic Philosophy
76
Part II
78
THE SOCRATIC PERIOD XII The Sophists
81
Some Individual Sophists
87
Minor Socratic Schools
116
Democritus of Abdera
124
Part III
127
Platos Works 33
133
Theory of Knowledge
142
The Doctrine of Forms
163
The Psychology of Plato
207
Moral Theory
216
The State
223
Physics or Plato 44
253
Note on the Influence of Plato
260
The Old Academy 63
263
Life and Writings of Aristotle
266
Logic of Aristotle
286
The Early Stoa
385
Epicureanism
401
Note on Cynicism in the First Period op the Hellenistic Epoch
412
The Older Sceptics the Middle and New Academies
413
The Middle Stoa
421
Note on the Peripatetic School in the HellenisticRoman Period
425
The Later Stoa
428
Cynics Eclectics Sceptics 438
438
NeoPythagoreanism
446
Note ok Apollonius of Tyana
449
Middle Platonism
451
JewishHellenistic Philosophy
457
Plotinian NeoPlatonism
463
Other NeoPlatonic Schools
476
Concluding Review
486
Some Abbreviations used in this Volume
507
A Note on Sources 5
510
A Few Books
512
Index
517
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Frederick Copleston grew up in England (1907-1994). He was raised in an Anglican home but converted to Catholicism while a student at Marlborough College. He later became a Jesuit and then pursued a career in academia. He studied and lectured at Heythrop College and wrote an eleven-volume History of Philosophy, which is highly respected. He also spent time teaching at Gregorian University in Rome and, after he retired, lectured at Santa Clara University in California. He was appointed a member of the British Academy in 1970. He is famouse for debating Betrand Russell over the existence of God in a 1948 BBC broadcast.