The "Lady Maud,": Schooner Yacht

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R.F. Fenno, 1896 - 312 pages
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Page 43 - The helmsman steered, the ship moved on; Yet never a breeze up blew; The mariners all 'gan work the ropes, Where they were wont to do: They raised their limbs like lifeless tools— We were a ghastly crew. The body of my brother's son Stood by me, knee to knee: The body and I pulled at one rope, But he said nought to me.
Page 64 - Adieu, adieu ! my native shore Fades o'er the waters blue ; The night-winds sigh, the breakers roar, And shrieks the wild sea-mew. Yon sun that sets upon the sea We follow in his flight ; Farewell awhile to him and thee, My native Land — Good night...
Page 91 - I caught sight of Sir Mordaunt in the midst of a crowd of passengers, talking and laughing, and evidently in high spirits. ' Mr. Walton,' said Miss Tuke, ' remember your promise to take me downstairs to see where the emigrants sleep and live. Mr. Woodman is kind enough to say he will accompany us.' ' By all means let us go,' said I. ' But first let me ask you what you think of this scene. Is it not a sight worth coming to see ? ' ' It is indeed. I should have been very sorry to miss it. How foolish...
Page 17 - ... Along this rich surface the water was flying in a thin line of foam, and the ripping of the stem sounded like the crunch of feet upon rotten leaves. From the inclined, beautifully-moulded side of the vessel the shrouds ruled the sky like bars of iron, and cast jetblack tracings upon the cotton-white decks. The great spaces of canvas filled the air overhead, and it was a delight to look up at the leaning, bright yellow masts, and mark the superb set and cut of the sails and the prodigious number...
Page 90 - ... him, with a look so brimful of love and happiness, that I was ass enough — seeing that I was not the recipient of that glorious expression — to feel a good deal moved by it. Out of the fulness of the heart the mouth speaketh. Old Mr. Wheeler seemed to have been more candid with me than he intended, for he hung back after this, as though he feared that any topic we should get upon would lead him back to this business of his daughter. It was close upon seven o'clock when we left the table,...
Page 152 - ... liquid blue glass. The shark, however, maintained a distance from us that he never shifted by the breadth of a hair, though I could not detect any movement in his body. He was fully twelve feet long, and with his huge shovelnose, and hump-like fin, and tremorless, iron-skinned and most powerfully-built body, looked as treacherous, malignant, and deadly a brute as any man would delight to slaughter. ' See how he follows us, Walton ! ' shouted Sir Mordaunt. ' How the dickens does he keep himself...
Page 120 - Is that what you mean ? " "I won't say that — I won't go so far as that," said he, in a subdued, anxious voice. " But I am afraid the man has been fool enough to swallow more than his head can carry.
Page 18 - You can see the yacht going through the water, if you'll come here,' said I to her. She came at once, and I think she had a treat. I spoke to her, but she did not answer me. The sweeping water, the sensation of flying induced by the almost noiseless and quite level passage over the clear sea, and the beautiful effect of the brass-like copper against the foam, and the ocean of white canvas against the deep blue sky, acted upon her like a spell.
Page 8 - The gentleman who stood near was Mr. Norie, MB, who had been shipped by Sir Mordaunt to look after her ladyship's health. He had a smooth-shaven face and black eyes, and would have passed for an actor or a priest. The rest of the party consisted of two superb mastiffs, which lay near the mainmast in the sunshine, outside the shadow line of the awning. They were a noble pair of dogs, and they reclined with their great paws stretched along, enjoying the heat of the decks, and watching the men tumbling...
Page 130 - ... the bowline was caught with plenty of slack, and tossed over my shoulders. I gave the order myself to hoist up, and whether from flurry or worry chose the wrong moment, ie when the boat was at the bottom of a sea instead of being on the top of it ; the result of which was, I found myself travelling into the air with the boat and the sea in full chase of me, and coming much faster than I was going. Fortunately a swing of the yacht cleared me of the boat, which, had she struck my legs, must have...

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