The Arabian Nights Entertainments

Front Cover
Andrew Lang, Henry Justice Ford
Longmans Green & Company, 1898 - Adventure and adventurers - 424 pages
Lang was a serious novelist, literary critic and anthropologist who was cursed with fame as a children's author—in fact, he was the editor of an extremely popular series of "fairy books"; and so, here he presents stories from Galland as if they were fairy tales.
 

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Contents

I
xv
II
4
III
11
IV
17
V
21
VI
27
VII
30
VIII
32
XIV
100
XV
185
XVI
194
XVII
207
XVIII
214
XIX
265
XX
293
XXI
314

IX
46
X
52
XI
66
XII
73
XIII
84
XXII
318
XXIII
329
XXIV
344
XXV
356

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Page 137 - The rhinoceros fights with the elephant, and piercing him in his belly with his horn, carries him off on his head; but as the fat and blood of the elephant run down on his eyes and blind him, he falls on the ground, and, what...
Page 297 - since chance hath made us aware of its virtues, we will use it, and the ring likewise, which I shall always wear on my finger.
Page 313 - So saying, the genie disappeared. Aladdin went back to the Princess, saying his head ached, and requesting that the holy Fatima should be fetched to lay her hands on it. But when the magician came near, Aladdin, seizing his dagger, pierced him to the heart. "What have you done?" cried the Princess. "You have killed the holy woman!" "Not so," replied Aladdin, "but a wicked magician," and told her of how she had been deceived.
Page 309 - He carries it about with him,' said the princess, ' I know, for he pulled it out of his breast to show me. He wishes me to break my faith with you and marry him , saying that you were beheaded by my father's command. He is for ever speaking ill of you, but I only reply by my tears. If I persist, I doubt not but he will use violence.
Page 25 - I would open all the treasures of the earth to any one that should set me at liberty ; but with no better success. In the third, I promised to make my deliverer a potent monarch, to be always near him in...
Page 296 - For two days Aladdin remained in the dark, crying and lamenting. At last he clasped his hands in prayer, and in so doing rubbed the ring, which the magician had forgotten to take from him. Immediately an enormous and frightful genie rose out of the earth, saying: "What wouldst thou with me? I am the Slave of the Ring, and will obey thee in all things.
Page 312 - If that is all," replied Aladdin, "you shall soon be happy." He left her and rubbed the lamp, and when the genie appeared commanded him to bring a roc's egg. The genie gave such a loud and terrible shriek that the hall shook. "Wretch!" he cried, "is it not enough that I have done everything for you, but you must command me to bring my master and hang him up in the midst of this dome? You and your wife and your palace deserve to be burnt to ashes, but...
Page 313 - Is it not enough that I and the other slaves of the lamp have done everything for you, but you, by an unheard-of ingratitude, must command me to bring my master, and hang him up in the midst of this dome? This attempt deserves that you...
Page 306 - He snatched it and bade the slave take her choice, amid the jeers of the crowd. Little he cared, but left off crying his lamps, and went out of the city gates to a lonely place, where he remained till nightfall, when he pulled out the lamp and rubbed it. The genie appeared, and at the magician's command carried him, together with the palace and the Princess in it, to a lonely place in Africa. Next morning the Sultan looked out of the window towards Aladdin's palace and rubbed his eyes, for it was...

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