The Reformed Society of Israelites of Charleston, S.C.: With an Appendix: The Constitution of the Society

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Bloch Publishing Company, 1916 - Jews - 54 pages
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Page 17 - Your memorialists seek no other end, than the future welfare and respectability of the nation. As members of the great family of Israel, they cannot consent to place before their children examples, which are only calculated to darken the mind, and withhold from the rising generation, the more rational means of worshipping the true God.
Page 18 - According to the present mode of reading the Parasa, it affords to the hearer neither instruction nor entertainment, unless he be competent to read as well as comprehend the Hebrew language. But if, like all other ministers, our reader would make a chapter or verse the subject of an English discourse once a week, at the expiration of the year the people would, at all events, know something of that religion which at present they so little regard.
Page 17 - Hasan, or reader, to repeat in English such part of the Hebrew prayers as may be deemed necessary, it is confidently believed that the congregation generally would be more forcibly impressed with the necessity of Divine Worship, and the moral obligations which they owe to themselves and their Creator; While such a course, would lead to more decency and decorum during the time they are engaged in the performance of religious duties. It is not every one who has the means, and many have not the time,...
Page 18 - Your memorialists would next call the particular attention of your honorable body, to the absolute necessity of abridging the service generally. They have reflected seriously upon its present length, and are confident, that this is one of the principal causes why so much of it is hastily and improperly hurried over.
Page 15 - This Congregation will not encourage or interfere with making proselytes under any pretence whatever, nor shall any such be admitted under the jurisdiction of this Congregation, until he, she, or they produce legal and satisfactory credentials, from some other Congregation, where a regular Chief, or Rabbi and Hebrew Consistory is established; and, provided, he, she, or they are not people of color.
Page 21 - In their creed, which accompanies their ritual, they subscribe to nothing of rabbinical interpretation, or rabbinical doctrines. They are their own teachers, drawing their knowledge from the Bible, and following only the laws of Moses, and those only as far as they can be adapted to the institutions of the Society in which they live and enjoy the blessings of liberty.
Page 17 - By causing the Hasan, or reader, to repeat in English such part of the Hebrew prayers as may be deemed necessary, it is confidently believed that the congregation generally would be more forcibly impressed with the necessity of Divine worship...
Page 32 - As soon as this Society finds itself able, it will educate a youth or youths of the Jewish persuasion classically in the English, Latin, and Hebrew languages, so as to render him or them fully competent to perform divine service, not only with ability, learning, and dignity, but also according to the true spirit of Judaism, for which this Institution was formed ; and in the meanwhile, this Society will adopt and support, as soon as practicable, any person so qualified for the sacred office.
Page 22 - We wish not to overthrow, but to rebuild ; we wish not to destroy, but to reform and revise the evils complained of; we wish not to abandon the institutions of Moses, but to understand and observe them; in fine, we wish to worship God, not as slaves of bigotry and priestcraft, but as the enlightened descendants of that chosen race, whose blessings have been scattered throughout the land of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.
Page 19 - The Jews born in Carolina are mostly of our way of thinking on the subject of worship, and act from a tender regard for the opinions and feelings of their parents in not joining the society.

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