Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte

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User Review  - ACDoyleLibrary - LibraryThing

"But here are the three volumes of the physician Bourrienne — that Bourrienne who knew him so well. Does any one ever know a man so well as his doctor? They are quite excellent and admirably translated." --Through the Magic Door, pg. 196 Read full review

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User Review  - keylawk - LibraryThing

Bourrienne was an official in the Directory, and served as Secretary to Napoleon. Unblushing admirer of NB although an "utter stranger to the noble profession of arms" and quite aware that NB ... Read full review

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Page 518 - The allied powers having proclaimed that the Emperor Napoleon is the only obstacle to the re-establishment of peace in Europe, the Emperor Napoleon, faithful to his oath, declares that he renounces for himself and his heirs, the thrones of France and Italy, and that there is no personal sacrifice, even that of life, •which he is not ready to make for the interests of France.
Page 582 - ROYAL HIGHNESS, — Exposed to the factions which divide my Country, and to the enmity of the greatest Powers of Europe, I have terminated my political career ; and I come, like Themistocles, to throw myself upon the hospitality of the British People. I place myself under the protection of their laws, which I claim from your Royal Highness, as the most powerful, the most constant, and the most generous of my enemies.
Page 578 - Frenchmen ! — In commencing war for maintaining the national independence, I relied on the union of all efforts, of all wills, and the concurrence of all the national authorities. I had reason to hope for success, and I braved all the declarations of the powers against me. " Circumstances appear to me changed. I offer myself as a sacrifice to the hatred of the enemies of France.
Page 126 - ... perhaps Joseph a little, from habit, and because he is my elder; and Duroc, I love him too ; but why ? — because his character pleases me: he is stern and resolute, and I believe the fellow never shed a tear.
Page 584 - No foreign vessels were allowed to anchor, unless under circumstances of great distress ; in which case, no person from them was permitted to land, and an officer and party from one of the ships of war was sent on board to take charge of them as long as they remained, as well as in order to prevent any improper communication.
Page 33 - Hitherto," (he thus addressed his troops) "you have been fighting for barren rocks, memorable for your valor, but useless to your country ; but now your exploits equal those of the armies of Holland and the Rhine. You were utterly destitute, and you have supplied all your wants. You have gained battles without cannon, passed rivers without bridges, performed forced marches without shoes, bivouacked without strong liquors, and often without bread. None but republican phalanxes, soldiers of liberty,...
Page 17 - Nine 74-gun ships, and four frigates or corvettes, fell a prey to the flames. The fire and smoke from the arsenal resembled the eruption of a volcano, and the thirteen vessels which were burning in the road, were like so many magnificent displays of fireworks. The masts and forms of the vessels were distinctly marked by the blaze, which lasted many hours, and formed an unparalleled spectacle.
Page 587 - France, within the limits of the rocky island to which his last years were limited, was the alternative that remained ; and sensible that this was likely to be the case, he had himself indicated the spot where he wished to lie. It was a small secluded recess, called Slane's, or Haines...
Page 71 - CORVETTES; 18 GALLEYS; ARMISTICE WITH THE KING OF SARDINIA ; CONVENTION WITH GENOA ; ARMISTICE WITH THE DUKE OF PARMA ; ARMISTICE WITH THE KING OF NAPLES ; ARMISTICE WITH THE POPE ; PRELIMINARIES OF LEOBEN ; CONVENTION OF MONTEBELLO WITH THE REPUBLIC OF GENOA ; TREATY OF PEACE WITH THE EMPEROR OF GERMANY AT CAMPOFORMIO.
Page 72 - He appeared to me to listen with more abstra^ction than interest, as if occupied rather with what he was thinking of, than with what was said to him. There is great intelligence in his countenance, along with an expression of habitual meditation, which reveals nothing of what is passing within. In that thinking head, in that daring mind, it is im-\ possible not to suppose that some designs are engendering which will have their influence on the destinies of Europe.

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