The Dublin Journal of Medical Science, Volume 84

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Fannin & Company, 1887 - Medicine
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Page 204 - A lady, who was watching her little child at play, saw a heavy window-sash fall upon its hand, cutting off three of the fingers ; and she was so much overcome by fright and distress, as to be unable to render it any assistance. A surgeon was speedily obtained, who, having dressed the wounds, turned himself to the mother, whom he found seated, moaning, and complaining of pain in her hand. On examination, three fingers, corresponding to those injured in the child, were discovered to be swollen and...
Page 204 - ... fingers ; and she was so much overcome by fright and distress, as to be unable to render it any assistance. A surgeon was speedily obtained, who, having dressed the wounds, turned himself to the mother, whom he found seated, moaning and complaining of pain in her hand. On examination, three fingers corresponding to those injured in the child, were discovered to be swollen and inflamed, although they had ailed nothing prior to the accident. In four-and-twenty hours, incisions were made into them...
Page 414 - The curve of the bougie is short ; large curves are mistakes. 8. The plates must be immersed in the fluid before the electrodes are placed on the patient, and raised again after the electrodes have been removed. 9. All operations must begin and end while the battery is at zero, increasing and decreasing the current slowly and gradually by one cell at a time, avoiding any shock to the patient. 10. Before operating, the susceptibility of the patient to the electric current should be ascertained.
Page 264 - Year-Book of the Scientific and Learned Societies of Great Britain and Ireland...
Page 534 - The introduction of matters consumed in the production of heat in fever, diminishes rather than increases the intensity of the pyrexia. (14) As the oxidation of alcohol necessarily involves the formation of water and limits the destruction of tissue, its action in fever tends to restore the normal processes of heat-production, in which the formation of water plays an important part. (15) The great objects in the treatment of fever itself are to limit and reduce the pyrexia by direct and indirect...
Page 27 - First come the reapers who, entering upon untrodden ground, cut down great store of corn from all sides of them. These are the early anatomists of modern Europe such as Vesalius, Fallopius, Malpighi and Harvey. Then come the gleaners, who gather up ears enough from the bare ridges to make a few loaves of bread. Such were the anatomists of last century, Valsalva, Cotunnius, Haller, Vicq d'Azyr, Camper, Hunter and the two Monros.
Page 210 - When the incantation was performed only on a lock of hair, &c., the effects appear to have been similar and death speedy. " The most acute agonies and terrific distortions of the body were often experienced ; the wretched sufferer appeared in a state of frantic madness, or as they expressed it, torn by the evil spirit, while he foamed and writhed under his dreadful power.
Page 16 - Hospital ; Examiner in Materia Medica in the University of London, in the Victoria University, and in the Royal College of Physicians, London ; late Examiner in the University of Edinburgh. A TEXT-BOOK OF PHARMACOLOGY, THERAPEUTICS, AND MATERIA MEDICA.
Page 374 - New (sixth) edition, thoroughly revised and rewritten by the Author, assisted by WILLIAM H. WELCH, MD, Professor of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and AUSTIN FLINT, JR., MD, LL.
Page 352 - Studies, by AUSTIN FLINT, MD, Professor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine and of Clinical Medicine in the Bellevue Hospital Medical College.

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