Snow and Ice Sports: A Winter Manual

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E. P. Dutton, 1923 - Winter sports - 293 pages
 

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Page 156 - ... essential, but on a bright sunny day, at any rate, you can obtain noticeably better pictures with than without one. On gray days the difference is not so marked. The period of exposure given to the film should always be two or three times longer with a filter than under the same conditions without one. Just as a good snow-storm picture gives one the feel of the storm, so should a clear-weather photograph hold suggestion either of the grayness or brightness of the day. But the hours when the sun...
Page 156 - ... of the storm, so should a clear-weather photograph hold suggestion either of the grayness or brightness of the day. But the hours when the sun shines most brightly are not the best for getting the sense of brightness. More effective pictures can be obtained before mid-morning and after mid-afternoon than in the middle of the day. The long, rangy shadows cast across the white blanket of snow in early and late hours are oftentimes the very making of a picture. It must be remembered, however, that...
Page 156 - MOUNTAINS film or plate in winter is quite different from what it is in summer. The summer-season amateur taking up snow photography for the first time will have poor success unless he acquires a new set of exposure rules. Any one wholly unfamiliar with light conditions can easily be fooled into thinking that there is more light on a bright winter day with the glare of the sun on the white enow than on an ordinary summer day. The camera, however, cannot be fooled. It knows very well the difference...
Page 156 - ... amateur taking up snow photography for the first time will have poor success unless he acquires a new set of exposure rules. Any one wholly unfamiliar with light conditions can easily be fooled into thinking that there is more light on a bright winter day with the glare of the sun on the white enow than on an ordinary summer day. The camera, however, cannot be fooled. It knows very well the difference between summer and winter light, knows that the matter is wholly one of light intensity. The...
Page 158 - ... you rely upon a good exposure meter. One of these can be purchased in any photographic store. Even when guided by a reliable exposure meter one would do wisely to make a certain amount of allowance for the physical changes which the mechanism of a camera goes through In winter. Cold weather affects the metal parts. It oftentimes happens that a shutter works more slowly on a cold winter day than it does in summer. Indeed, there have been times with my own camera when the shutter has refused to...
Page 151 - IN MIDWINTER SNOW PHOTOGRAPHY BY ELON JESSUP THE amateur photographer who fails to take advantage of the unique photographic possibilities of snow-time is missing some of the best pictures of all the year. It is within the sphere of snowscapes that the camera comes perhaps closest of all of making an accurate record of nature as she appears to the human eye and imagination. Nature in snow-time is a study In gradations of black and white. Her cloak has become marvelously simplified since summer days,...
Page 246 - These are probably wan-anted to keep any ambitious fancy skater reasonably busy for some time to come. But after he has mastered these he need not complain that there are no new worlds to conquer, for there are scores of other figures awaiting the signal from his steel blades. And let him always bear in mind that each one of these numerous figures is but an application of the few fundamental movements mentioned earlier in this chapter. The obvious moral is that it is wise to learn thoroughly the...
Page 246 - A more simple figure to execute is the "anvil." This is skated throughout on the outer edge of the skate. First make a half circle forward, then a straight line backward and follow this up by making another half circle forward in such a way that the two arcs intersect Four of these "anvils...
Page 239 - ... the blade instead of the point). The right skate tilted on its outer edge has started to describe a half circle to the right from this impetus. The weight of the body is thrown forward on the right leg and this leg is bent at the knee. At the same time, the body is tilted toward the inside of the half circle which is being described. And of great importance, the left shoulder should be pressed well back.
Page 28 - Near the rear of this strap at a point where it fits around the heel is a metal snap-lever buckle. With a quick flick of the fingers, this buckle can be instantly closed or opened. And it is by these respective proceedings that the boot is attached or released from the ski. It is an arrangement which is snug and secure enough to hold the foot firmly in place on the ski as long as you wish it there and at the same time you can toss your skis free with a mere kick if the need arises.

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