The Painful Field: The Psychiatric Dimension of Modern War

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Greenwood Press, Jan 1, 1988 - History - 187 pages
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Colored by the popular and official mythologies of heroism, the accepted view of mental collapse during combat is that it is a fairly rare occurrence that can be attributed to psychological weakness or simple cowardice. With the advent of each new generation of weapons, however, this view becomes less tenable. The increasingly lethal battlefields of conventional warfare have sharply escalated the numbers of psychiatric casualties, which reached staggering proportions worldwide by the early 1980s. Professor Gabriel, a leading authority on military psychiatry, provides the first systematic examination of the problem, its history and current dimension, the systems developed by the superpowers to counter it, and the far-reaching implications of our continued acceptance of warfare under radically altered conditions.

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Contents

The Limits of Human Endurance
25
The Face of Modern War
47
Development of Soviet Military Psychiatry
67
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (1988)

Richard A. Gabriel is a distinguished professor in the Department of History and War Studies at the Royal Military College of Canada and in the Department of Defence Studies at the Canadian Forces College in Toronto. He was professor of history and politics at the U.S. Army War College and held the Visiting Chair in Military Ethics at the Marine Corps University. A retired U.S. Army officer living in Manchester, New Hampshire, Gabriel is the author of numerous books and articles on military history and other subjects, including "Muhammad: Islam s First Great General" and "Scipio Africanus: Rome s Greatest General" (Potomac Books, Inc., 2008).

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