Hyman's Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

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University of Chicago Press, Sep 15, 1992 - Science - 788 pages
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The purpose of this book, now in its third edition, is to introduce the morphology of vertebrates in a context that emphasizes a comparison of structire and of the function of structural units. The comparative method involves the analysis of the history of structure in both developmental and evolutionary frameworks. The nature of adaptation is the key to this analysis. Adaptation of a species to its environment, as revealed by its structure, function, and reproductive success, is the product of mutation and natural selection–the process of evolution. The evolution of structure and function, then, is the theme of this book which presents, system by system, the evolution of structure and function of vertebrates. Each chapter presents the major evolutionary trends of an organ system, with instructions for laboratory exploration of these trends included so the student can integrate concept with example.
 

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I've already learned to love the original edition and when I discovered this version, I really loved it. It's very comprehensive...and I particularly appreciate the comparative embryology sections.

Contents

Classification External Anatomy
7
Essential Features of Lower Types
57
4
87
The Comparative Anatomy of the Integumental Skeleton
112
The Comparative Anatomy of
192
The Comparative Anatomy of the Girdles
238
The Comparative Anatomy of
265
The Comparative Anatomy of the Muscular System
327
The Comparative Anatomy of the Coelom and of
378
The Comparative Anatomy of the Circulatory System
448
List of Contributors
771
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

Marvalee H. Wake is a professor emerita of integrative biology at the University of California, Berkeley.

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