Masters of Atlantis

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Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, Dec 1, 2010 - 272 pages
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Following last year's enthusiastically received reissue of Charles Portis's novels The Dog of the South and Norwood comes the republication of The Masters of Atlantis, the third in Overlook's reissues of the novels of this American master. This unforgettable novel centers on Lamar Jimmerson, a man in the front ranks of the modern-day Gnomon Society, the international fraternal order dedicated to preserving the arcane wisdom of the lost city of Atlantis. Stationed in France in 1917, Jimmerson comes across a little book crammed with Atlantean puzzles, Egyptian riddles, and extended alchemical metaphors, the Codex Pappus -- said to be the sacred Gnomonic text. Soon he is basking in the lore of lost Atlantis, convinced that his mission on earth is to administer and expand the ranks of this noble brotherhood. Taking us through the entire New Cycle of Gnomonism -- through the publication of Jimmerson's own Gnomonic texts, through the scandalous schism that rocks the Gnomonic community, through Jimmerson's disastrous bid for the governorship of Indiana, to the fateful gathering of Gnomons in a mobile-home park in East Texas -- Masters of Atlantis is a cockeyed journey into an America of misfits and con men, oddballs and innocents. It is quintessential Portis.

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Masters of Atlantis: a novel

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Portis is on a roll thanks to Overlook's rejuvenation of several of his older titles in recent months. This 1985 book "concerns the establishment of the order of the Gnomons, a secret society ... Read full review

Masters of Atlantis: a novel

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Conmen, crazies, and the super-credu lous rush madly about in Portis's newest novel, which concerns the es tablishment of the order of Gnomons, a secret society purporting to teach the hidden ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Charles Portis lives in Arkansas, where he was born and educated. Portis served as a reporter for the New York Herald-Tribune and was also its London bureau chief. His first novel, Norwood, was published in 1966. His other novels are True Grit, The Dog of the South, and Gringos. True Grit has been made into a movie two times, once in 1969 with John Wayne (who won his only academy award by playing the main character of Rooster Cogburn), and a second time in 2010 with Jeff Bridges as the main character. Mr. Bridges was nominated for the Rooster Cogburn role, but did not win.

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