The other world: issues and politics of the developing world

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Longman/Pearson, 2005 - History - 334 pages
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Providing a fascinating tour of the culture, politics, religions, geography, economics, history, and peoples of Latin America, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, this book explores the current issues and problems common to countires in the developing world. The Other World; The Old and the New: Colonialism, Neocolonialism, and Nationalism; Political Economy; Women and Development; Latin America; Sub-Saharan Africa; Asia; The Middle East and North Africa; Central Asia; Prospects for the Future. Anyone interested in Third World issues and problems.

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Contents

Global Issues in the Other World
1
The Changing Social Structures
10
CHAPTER 2
17
Copyright

30 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

Joseph N. Weatherby" has been a professor of political science at California Polytechnic State University since 1968. In 1977 he was an invited visiting scholar at Wolfson College, The University of Cambridge, England. He has been awarded a summer Fulbright to the Middle East, an "NEH" Fellowship in Middle East Studies at The University of Michigan, and a Joseph P Malone Fellowship in Arab and Islamic Studies. At Cal Poly, he has chaired the academic senate and received the university's outstanding teaching award. He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from Baylor University, Texas, a foreign trade degree from The American Graduate School for International Management, Arizona, and a Ph.D. in political science and Middle East Studies from the University of Utah.

"Randal L. Cruikshanks" has been a professor of political science at California Polytechnic State University since 1972. He served as an officer in the United States Army in Germany and has held appointments at The University of New Mexico, The University of Kent, Canterbury, England, and The University of Maryland. He was awarded a summer Fulbright to Brazil and has spent time in China, Africa, and Russia. He served as department chair of the political science department at Cal Poly and holds a B.A. degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from The University of Oregon in international and comparative politics.

"Emmit B. Evans" has been a faculty member in the political science department at California Polytechnic State University since 1990. He has conducted research in Kenya, Mexico, and at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and was the executive director of a rural communitydevelopment organization in the southwestern United States for 10 years. His teaching and research interests are in the areas of comparative development administration, world food politics, and contemporary global issues. He is a former Peace Corps volunteer, having served in East Africa. He earned a Ph.D. degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley.

"Reginald Gooden" was born in Camaguey, Cuba, and spent his early years in Cuba and Panama. He has taught classes in inter-American relations and political philosophy at California Polytechnic State University since 1970. At Cal Poly he has chaired the academic senate. He has also served on The California State University Chancellor's Advisory Committee on General Education. He has been a member of the C.S.U. Academic Senate since 1985 and is their representative to the C.S.U. Academic Council on International Programs. He completed his undergraduate work at U.C.L.A. and earned his Ph.D. degree in political science from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

"Earl Huff" received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Idaho in 1970. He has travelled extensively in Asia, the Middle East, and elsewhere. Dr. Huff was the recipient of two Fulbright awards to study in Beirut, Lebanon, and in New Delhi, India. In the United Kingdom, he was awarded a Fulbright teaching position and also was an invited visiting scholar at Cambridge University. Although his primary academic interest is in the areas of U.S. foreign policy and Asian politics, he has also coauthored a very successful American government textbook.

"Richard Kranzdorf" has been a professor of political science at California Polytechnic StateUniversity since 1971. His specialties are African politics and environmental politics. He received a summer Fulbright to Pakistan and a second one to Poland and Hungary. Among the courses Dr. Kranzdorf currently teaches are: Introduction to International Relations, Politics of Global Survival, Contemporary Global Political Issues, Politics of Developing Areas, and African Politics. He is a former Peace Corps volunteer, having served in West Africa. He earned a B.A. degree from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in political science from The University of California, Los Angeles.

"Dianne Long" teaches political science and public administration at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, California, where she has been a member of the faculty since 1982. Her teaching and research interests center on public policy and administration, particularly antipoverty programs and urban sprawl. A former Peace Corps volunteer in Central Africa, Dr. Long continues her writings on the nature of Third World peoples and politics. As a contributor to two chapters in The Other World, she brings to the text a perspective on issues affecting women, environmental change, and technological adaptation. She holds a Master of Public Administration degree and a Ph.D. degree in political science from Michigan State University. She serves as chair of the political science department at Cal Poly and was the administrator of the Master's of Public Administration program at Michigan State University.

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