The Benjamin Franklin Bridge

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Arcadia Publishing, 2009 - History - 127 pages
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The Benjamin Franklin Bridge, originally named the Delaware River Bridge, was constructed to connect the cities of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Camden, New Jersey. For a time after its opening on July 1, 1926, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world, with a main span of 1,750 feet. The Benjamin Franklin Bridge contains many rarely seen images of the bridge's planning and construction, the individuals who helped make the concept of the bridge a reality, and the workers who built it. The bridge has undergone many changes in the decades since its opening, and these vintage photographs trace its evolution, illustrating the bridge's endurance as a symbol of the Philadelphia-Camden metropolitan area.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
6
Spanning the Delaware
29
Expanding its Purpose
97
4 Additional Crossings
113
The Bridge Today
121
Bibliography
127
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Michael Howard is an engineer at the Delaware River Port Authority, the agency that owns and operates the Benjamin Franklin Bridge. He has long held an interest in the bridge's history, and in transportation history as well, and is a member of the West Jersey chapter of the National Railway Historical Society. Maureen Howard, his wife, is an editor in the medical publishing industry and has a strong interest in local history. She is a member of the Camden County Historical Society.

Maureen Howard was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut on June 28, 1930. She graduated from Smith College in 1952 and immediately went to work in the publishing industry. She later taught at several universities including Columbia, Princeton, Amherst, and Yale. She is the author of several novels including Not a Word about Nightingales, Grace Abounding, Natural History, A Lover's Almanac, Bridgeport Bus, Expensive Habits, and The Rags of Time. Her autobiography, Facts of Life, received the National Book Critics Award for general nonfiction in 1980. She received an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

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