The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus

Front Cover
Thomas Williams
Cambridge University Press, 2003 - History - 408 pages
John Duns Scotus (1265/6-1308) was (along with Aquinas and Ockham) one of the three principal figures in medieval philosophy and theology, with an influence on modern thought arguably even greater than that of Aquinas. The essays in this volume systematically survey the full range of Scotus's thought. They take care to explain the technical details of his writing in lucid terms and demonstrate the relevance of his work to contemporary philosophical debate.New readers will find this the most convenient and accessible guide to Scotus currently available.
 

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Contents

The Life and Works of John Duns the Scot
1
Scotus on Metaphysics
15
Space and Time
69
Universals and Individuation
100
Duns Scotuss Modal Theory
129
Duns Scotuss Philosophy of Language
161
Duns Scotus on Natural Theology
193
Duns Scotus on Natural and Supernatural Knowledge of God
238
Cognition
285
Scotuss Theory of Natural Law
312
From Metaethics to Action Theory
332
Rethinking Moral Dispositions Scotus on the Virtues
352
Bibliography
377
Citations of Works Attributed to John Duns Scotus
395
Index
405
Copyright

Philosophy of Mind
263

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