A Tale of Two Cities

Front Cover
Macmillan Company, 1922 - 384 pages
21 Reviews
 

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Very hard to stay focused and understand, probably a good story (from the parts I understood)

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Why is this book so long. He takes a whole chapter to say they went to a bar and got lucie manettes father. OMG!!!!! Why do i have to read this. Intresting story just to many words.

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Contents

I
vii
II
3
III
6
IV
12
V
17
VI
29
VII
41
VIII
54
XXIV
198
XXVI
204
XXVII
211
XXVIII
219
XXIX
223
XXX
235
XXXI
241
XXXII
249

IX
61
X
68
XI
83
XII
89
XIII
96
XIV
109
XV
119
XVI
125
XVII
137
XVIII
146
XIX
150
XX
158
XXI
163
XXII
174
XXIII
186
XXXIII
262
XXXIV
275
XXXV
282
XXXVI
287
XXXVII
293
XXXIX
300
XLI
307
XLII
313
XLIII
326
XLIV
340
XLV
356
XLVI
360
XLVII
369
XLVIII
383
XLIX
396

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Page 401 - I am the Resurrection and the Life, saith the Lord : he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live : and whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die." The murmuring of many voices, the upturning of many faces, the pressing on of many footsteps in the outskirts of the crowd, so that it swells forward in a mass, like one great heave of water, all flashes away. Twenty-Three.
Page 12 - A WONDERFUL fact to reflect upon that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. A solemn consideration, when I enter a great city by night, that every one of those darkly clustered houses encloses its own secret; that every room in every one of them encloses its own secret; that every beating heart in the hundreds of thousands of breasts there, is, in some of its imaginings, a secret to the heart nearest to it ! Something of the awfuluess, even of...
Page 402 - It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.
Page 402 - I see that child who lay upon her bosom, and who bore my name, a man, winning his way up in that path of life which once was mine. I see him winning it so well, that my name is made illustrious there by the light of his. I see the blots I threw upon it faded away. I see him foremost of just judges and...
Page 30 - ... mouths; others made small mud-embankments, to stem the wine as it ran; others, directed by lookers-on up at high windows, darted here and there, to cut off little streams of wine that started away in new directions; others devoted themselves to the sodden and lee-dyed pieces of the cask, licking, and even champing the moister wine-rotted fragments with eager relish.

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