Vril: The Power of the Coming Race

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Dodo Press, Feb 1, 2009 - Fiction - 152 pages
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Edward George Earl Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton (1803-1873) was an English novelist, playwright, and politician. Bulwer-Lytton's literary career began in 1820, with the publication of his first book of poems. He wrote in a variety of genres, including historical fiction, mystery, romance, the occult, and science fiction. In 1828 he attracted general attention with Pelham, a humourous, intimate study of the dandyism of the age which kept gossips busy in identifying characters with public figures of the time. By 1833, he had reached the height of his popularity with Godolphin, followed by The Pilgrims of the Rhine (1834), The Last Days of Pompeii (1834), Rienzi: The Last of the Roman Tribunes (1835), and Harold: The Last of the Saxon Kings (1848). Lord Lytton was a florid, popular writer of his day, who coined such phrases as "the great unwashed," "pursuit of the almighty dollar," "the pen is mightier than the sword," and the infamous incipit "It was a dark and stormy night. "

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About the author (2009)

Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Lord of Lytton, was born on May 25, 1803 in London, England. He entered Trinity College, Cambridge in 1822, won the Chancellor's Gold Medal for English verse in 1825, and received a B.A. degree the following year. He was a novelist, poet, playwright, and politician. He coined the phrases the "pursuit of the almighty dollar", "the pen is mightier than the sword", and the opening line "It was a dark and stormy night". He wrote in a variety of genres, including historical fiction, mystery, romance, the occult, and science fiction. His works included Falkland, Pelham, Eugene Aram, The Last Days of Pompei, Ernest Maltravers, Zanoni, The Last of the Barons, The Caxtons, and A Strange Story. He also published several volumes of poetry including Ismael and The New Timon. His best known play was The Lady of Lyons. He served as the Secretary of State for the Colonies in from 1858 to 1859 and played a large part in the organization of the new colony of British Columbia. He became Baron Lytton of Knebworth in July 1866 and thereafter took his place in the House of Peers. He died on May 23, 1873, just short of his 70th birthday. The cause of death was not clear but it was thought that an infection he had in his ear had affected his brain.

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