A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents, 1789-1897: 1861-1869

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1897 - Presidents
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Reports, Documents, and Journals of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.
 

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Point to point navigation: a memoir, 1964 to 2006

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The title of this sequel to prolific author Vidal's 1995 memoir,Palimpsest , refers to navigating not with a compass but by memory of landmarks. Here, the demise of those near and dear to him is often ... Read full review

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this book is one every leather crafter would like to have. Read full review

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Page 8 - The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the government, and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion— no using of force against or among the people anywhere.
Page 108 - The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. But the constitution which at any time exists, 'till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all.
Page 279 - NEITHER PARTY EXPECTED FOR THE WAR THE MAGNITUDE OR THE DURATION WHICH IT HAS ALREADY ATTAINED. NEITHER ANTICIPATED THAT THE CAUSE OF THE CONFLICT MIGHT CEASE WITH OR EVEN BEFORE THE CONFLICT ITSELF SHOULD ' CEASE. EACH LOOKED FOR AN EASIER TRIUMPH AND A RESULT LESS FUNDAMENTAL AND ASTOUNDING.
Page 279 - Both read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invokes His aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces, but let us judge not, that we be not judged. The prayers of both could not be answered. That of neither has been answered fully. The Almighty has His own purposes. ' ' Woe unto the world because of offenses; for it must needs be that offenses " come, but woe to that man...
Page 144 - We say we are for the Union. The world will not forget that we say this. We know how to save the Union. The world knows we do know how to save it. We, even we here, hold the power and bear the responsibility. In giving freedom to the slave we assure freedom to the free — honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve. We shall nobly save or meanly lose the last, best hope of earth. Other means may succeed ; this could not fail. The way is plain, peaceful, generous, just — a way which if...
Page 109 - Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens.
Page 99 - That on the first day of January, in the year of "our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty"three, all persons held as slaves within any State or "designated part of a State, the people whereof shall "then be in rebellion against the United States, shall "be then, thenceforward, and forever free...
Page 107 - ... it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national Union to your collective and individual happiness...
Page 107 - But as it is easy to foresee that from different causes and from different quarters much pains will be taken, many artifices employed, to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth, as this is the point in your political fortress against which the batteries of internal and external enemies will be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and insidiously) directed...
Page 465 - If in the opinion of the people the distribution or modification of the constitutional powers be in any particular wrong, let it be corrected by an amendment in the way which the Constitution designates. But let there be no change by usurpation, for though this in one instance may be the instrument of good, it is the customary weapon by which free governments are destroyed.

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