Moving Millions: The Commercial Success and Political Controversies of Hong Kong's Railway

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Hong Kong University Press, May 1, 2008 - Transportation - 332 pages
With the "merger" of the MTRC and the KCRC in 2007, the history of Hong Kong's railways turned a new page. The two government-owned corporations were exceptionally profitable. Yet, this commercially successful railway model was not without social costs and political controversies.
 
Moving Millions critically examines the governance history of the MTRC and the KCRC over the past three decades, and sheds light on the challenges to Hong Kong's railway after the "merger". The author discusses complex relationships between railway management, government policy and politics. Critical issues are analysed, including corporate governance; railway-property development; funding and managing new projects; mismanagement and controversies; public accountability; and passenger interest in fares, choice and convenience.

The book compares how differently the MTRC and the KCRC dealt with the government, civil society, the market, and with each other to achieve commercial objectives and tackle public interests issues in a post-industrial society, where public expectations are rising despite constraints in democracy.
 

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Contents

Contrast in Corporate Governance
65
Challenges in Railway and Property Development
159
Passenger Interests
199
Looking to the Future from the Past
233
Epilogue
263
Endnotes
267
References
301
Index
309
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About the author (2008)

Dr Rikkie Yeung is a consultant and research scholar in public affairs and public policies. A former member of the Hong Kong Government's Central Policy Unit, Constitutional Affairs Bureau and Chief Secretary's Office, she was a visiting fellow at the Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies of the Brookings Institution in the United States in 2006-7. Dr Yeung received her doctoral degree from the University of Hong Kong and has an MBA as well as Master of Journalism.

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