Biography of Henry Clay

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S. Hanmer, Jr. and J.J. Phelps, 1831 - Cabinet officers - 304 pages
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Page 107 - American fishermen shall have liberty to dry and cure fish in any of the unsettled bays, harbours, and creeks of Nova Scotia, Magdalen Islands, and Labrador, so long as the same shall remain unsettled; but so soon as the same or either of them shall be settled, it shall not be lawful for the said fishermen to dry or cure fish at such settlement, without a previous agreement for that purpose with the inhabitants, proprietors, or possessors of the ground.
Page 212 - Resolved, That a committee be appointed on the part of this House, jointly with such committee as may be appointed on the part of the Senate, to wait on the President of the United States, and inform him that a quorum of the two Houses is assembled, and that Congress is ready to receive any communications he may be pleased to make.
Page 178 - Beware how you forfeit this exalted character ! Beware how you give a fatal sanction in this infant period of our republic scarcely yet two-score years old, to military insubordination!
Page 212 - House, respectively, whether it be expedient or not to make provision for the admission of Missouri into the Union on the same footing as the original States, and for the due execution of the laws of the United States within Missouri; and if not, whether any other, and what, provision adapted to her actual condition ought to be made by law.
Page 107 - States shall continue to enjoy unmolested the right to take fish of every kind on the Grand Bank, and on all the other banks of Newfoundland ; also, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and at all other places in the sea, where the inhabitants of both countries used at any time heretofore to fish...
Page 222 - In the month of January, in the year of our Lord and Saviour, 1824, while all European Christendom beheld, with cold and unfeeling indifference, the unexampled wrongs and inexpressible misery of Christian Greece, a proposition was made in the Congress of the United States, almost the sole, the last, the greatest...
Page 201 - That, in all that territory ceded by France to the United States, under the name of Louisiana...
Page 94 - How vain and impotent is party rage, directed against such a man! He is not more elevated by his lofty residence, upon the summit of his own favorite mountain, than he is lifted, by the serenity of his mind, and the consciousness of a well-spent life, above the malignant passions and bitter feelings of the day.
Page 102 - ... negotiate the terms of a peace at Quebec or at Halifax. We are told that England is a proud and lofty nation, which, disdaining to wait for danger, meets it half way. Haughty as she is, we once triumphed over her, and, if we do not listen to the counsels of timidity and despair, we shall again prevail. In such a cause, with the aid of Providence, we must come out crowned with success. But if we fail, let us fail like men, lash ourselves to our gallant tars, and expire together in one common struggle,...
Page 101 - What does a state of war present ? The united energies of one People arrayed against the combined energies of another ; a conflict in which each, party aims to inflict all the injury it can, by sea and land, upon the territories, property, and citizens of the other, — subject only to the rules of mitigated war, practised by civilized Nations.

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