A Journey to Damascus: Through Egypt, Nubia, Arabia PetrŠa, Palestine, and Syria, Volume 1

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H. Colburn, 1847 - Egypt
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Page 239 - They can never hold Syria, and govern it as your Highness did." He replied, after some minutes, " I spent more money upon Syria than years will repay. I drained Egypt to keep it in order. You might have gone securely from one end of it to the other. It is no affair of mine now. But you may tell Lord Palmerston and Lord Ponsonby, if ever you see them in England, that I know they wished to do me all the harm in their power ; but I now thank them, for, instead, they have done me good. They have taken...
Page 227 - ... attendant standing opposite to him, whose duty it is to carve every dish. Very little is placed on each plate, and the instant this is done the dish is removed, so that the guest has no chance of obtaining a second portion. In the middle of dinner, a nargileh was brought to the Pacha, of which he took two or three long draughts. He talked very little at the meal, and I found when he did it made him cough, for the Orientals are habitually silent while eating. The style of attendance at table is...
Page 187 - ... repose, and every now and then caressing his beard, or speaking to a passing acquaintance. We were invited to sit down, and he handed his pipe to Ismael Effendi, by which name Sir Gardiner Wilkinson is known here. My business was explained to him, after which he rose, put his feet into his papooshes, tucked up his long caftan, and departed, but he soon returned, bringing with him another Turk. At least a quarter of an hour was spent by them in animated discussion. The second Turk then left us,...
Page 225 - ... shawl, trimmed with a gold border. On a cushion on the divan which surrounded the room, lay his sword, which was as plain as a soldier's; a white handkerchief and a pair of gloves completed his equipment. So much for his dress. Behind his chair, which I was told had been given to him by Sir Moses Montefiore — a common " Dover," with leather straps for arms, and two cushions — stood the attendants, wearing silver decorations. One held a wisp of palm-leaves, to keep off the flies, and the other...
Page 72 - Dread, indeed, must have been the scene, and the hour of the downfal of Karnac ; for column upon column, tower on tower, walls, roofs, and even foundations broken up and cast down, lie on every side. The " abomination of desolation " sits upon Karnac. The wind has carried the drift of the desert round about it, but still the vast fabric remains. Mountains of sand could not conceal these vestiges of an earlier and mighty age. Wondrous must have been the power and genius of the people who raised them;...
Page 72 - The wind has carried the drift of the desert round about it, but still the vast fabric remains. Mountains of sand could not conceal these vestiges of an earlier and mighty age. Wondrous must have been the power and genius of the people who raised them; and yet how signal is their doom! The Persians and Greeks may have defaced, the Mahometan may have mutilated the records of the past, but it must have been a mightier hand and a stronger arm which accomplished this destruction. It was not with the...
Page 36 - Imagine a small court containing a half-starved ostrich, looking like a spectre, a monkey, a lynx, donkeys innumerable, camels, dromedaries, Arabs, couriers, dragomen, waiting to be hired; and in the midst of all, various specimens of the John Bull tribe, starting for India, by way of Suez, in Mackintoshes, straw hats, pea-jackets, and every variety of costume. I must not forget a bevy of ladies in green veils and poke bonnets, waiting to be shut into boxes like diminutive sedans, to be jolted across...
Page 225 - ... chose, he could appear to look through you — but his expression is soft, at least the one which apparently is habitual to him. He has dark eyebrows, not particularly shaggy, and his beard is celebrated for its silver whiteness, and the luxuriance of its growth. His hands are weather-beaten, but were formed for strength, and had no marked wrinkles, such as one would expect from his age, which is seventy-five. I could not correctly see his figure, which was completely concealed by the Eastern...
Page 224 - Oui, voila son altesse !" he replied. A red curtain was suddenly thrown aside, and we found ourselves in the presence. The Pacha was at dinner, with his back to the door, so that we could not see him, concealed as he was by the attendants, until we reached the table. It must here be stated that all our conversation was carried on through an interpreter, as the Pacha speaks only Turkish. On seeing us, he said "Welcome, I am glad to see you — sit down and eat.
Page 72 - ... disappear behind many of the single pieces. Beside the portal are two sitting statues of granite, facing each other. The great hall of the temple then appeared in all its sublimity. We felt that to behold these magnificent remains more than repaid us for what we had endured. The sight surpassed both all I had heard and all I had anticipated. Who can describe such majestic desolation? How came such enormous masses to be shaken to their foundation? No human power, one would suppose, could have...

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