An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Natural Knowledge

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Cosimo, Inc., Mar 1, 2007 - Science - 220 pages
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Considered the "high water mark of his philosophical achievement," Whitehead's book is a rigorous inquiry into the data of science and will be enjoyed by students of philosophy and physics alike. English mathematician and philosopher ALFRED NORTH WHITEHEAD (1861-1947) contributed significantly to 20th-century logic and metaphysics. With Bertrand Russell he cowrote the landmark Principia Mathematica, and also authored The Concept of Nature, The Function of Reason, and Process and Reality.
 

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Contents

THE TRADITIONS OF SCIENCE
2
THE DATA OF SCIENCE
4
ARTS PAGES 13 The Diversification op Nature 59oj
13
Events 6i6a
14
THE FOUNDATIONS
16
Maxwells Equations 2326
23
Clerk Maxwells Equations of
29
Motion through the Ether 374i
37
Abstractive Elements 108109
108
DURATIONS MOMENTS AND TIMESYSTEMS arts pages 33 Antiprimbs Durations and Moments 110112
110
Parallelism and TimeSystems 112115
112
Levels Rects and Puncts 115118
115
Parallelism and Order 118120
118
FINITE ABSTRACTIVE ELEMENTS 37 Absolute Primes and EventParticles 121123
121
Routes 123126
123
Solids
126

Mathematical Formulae 4750
47
it Congruence and Recognition 5457
54
Objects 6267
62
CHAPTER VI EVENTS 16 Apprehension of Events 6871
68
17 The Constants of Externality 7174
71
Extension 7477
74
Absolute Position 7778
77
ao The Community of Nature 7879
78
21 Characters of Events 7981
79
OBJECTS 22 Types of Objects 8283
82
SenseObjects 8388
83
Perceptual Objects 8893
88
Scientific Objects 9398
93
Duality of Nature 9899
98
PART III
101
Intersection Separation and Dissection
102
Abstractwe Classes 104106
104
Primes and Antiprimes 106108
106
POINTS AND STRAIGHT LINES 41 Stations 128129
128
PointTraces and Points 129131
129
Parallelism 131133
131
Matrices
133
Straight Lines 136138
136
NORMALITY AND CONGRUENCE 47 Normality 139140
139
Congruence 141146
141
MOTION 49 Analytic Geometry 147151
147
The Principle of Kinematic Symmetry 151155
151
Transitivity of Congruence 155157
155
The Three Types of Kinematics 157164
157
THE THEORY OF OBJECTS
165
MATERIAL OBJECTS
171
Extensive Magnitude 177181
177
Transition from Appearance to Cause 184189
184
FIGURES
190
that extension namely extension in time or extension
194
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Page 2 - The ultimate fact embracing all nature is (in this traditional point of view) a distribution of material throughout all space at a durationless instant of time, and another such ultimate fact will be another distribution of the same material throughout the same space at another durationless instant of time.
Page 5 - P", etc., and that the abstract possibility of this group of relations is what is meant by the point Q. The extremely valuable work on the foundations of geometry produced during the nineteenth century has proceeded from the assumption of points as ultimate given entities. This assumption, for the logical purpose of mathematicians, is entirely justified. Namely the mathematicians ask, What is the logical description of relations between points from which all geometrical theorems respecting such relations...
Page 3 - In biology the concept of an organism cannot be expressed in terms of a material distribution at an instant. The essence of an organism is that it is one thing which functions and is spread through space. Now functioning takes time. Thus a biological organism is a unity with a spatio-temporal extension which is of the essence of its being. This biological conception is obviously incompatible with the traditional ideas. This argument does not in any way depend on the assumption that biological phenomena...
Page 14 - The conception of knowledge as passive contemplation is too inadequate to meet the facts. Nature is ever originating its own development, and the sense of action is the direct knowledge of the percipient event as having its very being in the formation of its natural relations. Knowledge issues from this reciprocal insistence between this event and the rest of nature, namely relations are perceived in the making and because of the making.

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