Race and the Rise of Standard American

Front Cover
Walter de Gruyter, 2002 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 258 pages

This study examines the effect of race-consciousness upon the pronunciation of American English and upon the ideology of standardization in the twentieth century. It shows how the discourses of prescriptivist pronunciation, the xenophobic reaction against immigration to the eastern metropolises- especially New York - and the closing of the western frontier together constructed an image of the American West and Midwest as the locus of proper speech and ethnicity. This study is of interest to scholars and students in linguistics, American studies, cultural studies, Jewish studies, and studies in race, class, and gender.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Acknowledgements
1
The legitimation of accent
9
Pronunciations of race
75
Occident orient and alien
181
Conclusion
227
Afterword
233
References
241
Index
255
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Thomas Paul Bonfiglio is Associate Professor at the University of Richmond, Virginia, USA.

Bibliographic information