Die gallische Sprache und ihre Brauchbarkeit für die Geschichte

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Druck und Verlag der G. Braun'schen Hofbuchhandlung, 1851 - Celtic languages - 210 pages
 

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Page xiii - Recherches •ur la langue , l'origine et les antiquités des Bretons , pour servir à l'histoire de ce peuple; par MLTDC Bayonnc, 1792, in-S", 2* édit.
Page xiii - Gonidec, enrichi d'additions et d'un Essai sur l'histoire de la langue bretonne, par Th. Hersart de La Villemarqué.
Page x - Gaelic words, with their different significations in English ; and the Second Part comprising a Vocabulary of English words, with their various meanings in Gaelic.
Page xi - A grammar of the Irish language, published for the use of the senior classes in the College of St. Columba. Dublin: Hodges & Smith, 1845.
Page 19 - ... dialect in point of antiquity lays claim to rank next the Irish ; it has also been more cultivated than the other branches which we have noticed, for which reason we will not attempt any thing like a complete account of it, but reserve its more full investigation for another opportunity. THE IRISH. That the .Irish dialect is more ancient than any of the other Celtic branches cannot be doubted by any, unless their minds are imbued with the particular prejudice of their own dialects. But to any...
Page 132 - Franks, durant cette prenmière époque qui embrasse presque tout l'empire , introduisirent .peu d'éléments nouveaux. Nulle force humaine ne saurait con^traindre un peuple à changer son langage: les Gallo-Romains ,,ont donc gardé le leur dans notre patrie. Cependant nous ,, voyons qu'à la fin de l'empire, ce langage, latin d'origine, était , devenu sans intervention étrangère (?), un dialecte romain qui .différait du latin par des caractères essentiels. Le germe de -ce dialecte e»t donc,...
Page xii - An Outline of the characteristics of the Welsh and its utility in connection with other ancient languages for developing the primitive speech of mankind.
Page 132 - ... nouveaux. Nulle force humaine ne saurait con,,traindre un peuple à changer son langage: les Gallo-Romains ,,ont donc gardé le leur dans notre patrie. Cependant nous „ voyons qu'à la fin de l'empire, ce langage, latin d'origine, était „ devenu sans intervention étrangère (?), un dialecte romain qui ^différait du latin par des caractères essentiels. Le germe de -ce dialecte est donc arrivé des diverses contrées de r Italie avec *,les vainqueurs.
Page 19 - ... object of literature, is deserving of the utmost attention. It possesses all the marks of a primordial tongue, and derives its origin from the most remote antiquity. Its primitive words are generally monosyllables. The different classes of derivatives are produced by a mechanism simple and regular. It furnishes a key to all those other branches of the widely extended Celtic, which imitate the formation of its inflections, but are much inferior to it in simplicity and in the preservation of the...
Page 19 - ... humble labours can have that effect,) it is hoped that the intention will secure him, at least, the indulgence of that portion of his fellow countrymen, who feel an interest in the preservation of the venerable language of their ancestors. This language, as an object of literature, is deserving of the utmost attention. It possesses all the marks of a primordial tongue, and derives its origin from the most remote antiquity. Its primitive words are generally monosyllables. The different classes...

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