Trials of the Heart

Front Cover
Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1845 - 447 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 66 - Lines Written in Early Spring I HEARD a thousand blended notes, While in a grove I sate reclined, In that sweet mood when pleasant thoughts Bring sad thoughts to the mind. To her fair works did Nature link The human soul that through me ran; And much it grieved my heart to think What man has made of man. Through primrose tufts, in that green bower, The periwinkle trailed its wreaths; And 'tis my faith that every flower Enjoys the air it breathes.
Page 316 - Thus saith the LORD of hosts, Consider ye, and call for the mourning women, that they may come; and send for cunning women, that they may come : and let them make haste, and take up a wailing for us, that our eyes may run down with tears, and our eyelids gush out with waters.
Page 367 - O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your son— believe it, O, believe it!— Most dangerously you have with him prevail'd, If not most mortal to him.
Page 145 - tis certain ; very sure, very sure : death, as the Psalmist saith, is certain to all ; all shall die.
Page 339 - I fetch my life and being From men of royal siege; and my demerits May speak unbonneted to as proud a fortune As this that I have reach'd : for know, lago, But that I love the gentle Desdemona, I would not my unhoused free condition Put into circumscription and confine For the sea's worth.
Page 324 - Doth add more grief to too much of mine own. Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs; Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes; Being vex'd, a sea nourish 'd with lovers
Page 6 - Was wanting yet the pure delight of love By sound diffused, or by the breathing air, Or by the silent looks of happy things, Or flowing from the universal face Of earth and sky. But he had felt the power Of Nature, and already was prepared, By his intense conceptions, to receive Deeply the lesson deep of love which he, Whom. Nature, by whatever means, has taught To feel intensely, cannot but receive.
Page 381 - One fatal remembrance, one sorrow that throws Its bleak shade alike o'er our joys and our woes. To which life nothing darker or brighter can bring, For which joy has no balm and affliction no sting...
Page 378 - I saw him stand Before an Altar— with a gentle bride; Her face was fair, but was not that which made The Starlight of his Boyhood;— as he stood Even at the Altar, o'er his brow there came The self-same aspect, and the quivering shock That in the antique Oratory shook His bosom in its solitude; and then— As in that hour— a moment o'er his face The tablet of unutterable thoughts Was traced,— and then it faded as...
Page 13 - These violent delights have violent ends, And in their triumph die; like fire and powder, Which, as they kiss, consume...

Bibliographic information