The letters of Horace Walpole, ed. by P. Cunningham

Front Cover
1857
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

To Lady Ossory Jan 29 Dr Dodd dismissed from his chaplaincy
55
LETTER PAOE
56
To Mann March 28 Lord OrfordLady Mary Cokes reception at Turin
69
To Mann May 15 Rumoured death of the French KingParticulars
83
MTTU PAGB
85
To Lady Ossory Jane 14 His own course of lifeArrival of Lady Mary
91
To Mason July 19 Sending Grays ItineraryHis press at a dead stand
97
ToSclwyn Aug 10 His visit to Matson the seat of Selwyn
103
To Mason Aug 23 Offer of tho use of his PressDr Johnsons style
109
To Lady Ossory Aug 23 The Duchess of LeinsterMarriage of Lord
110
To Mason Sept 16 Grays satirical verses on Jemmy Twiteher Lord
117
To Conway Sept 27 Rejoices at the Generals flattering reception
123
To Cole Oct 11 ElectionsHis nephews mental alienation
131
LETTER PASS
137
To Mann Nov 11 Departure of the goutGamingWilkes and Charles
143
To Lady Ossory Nov 14 He alludes with affected gravity to the state
151
To the same Dec 26 The Trince de ContiProceedings of the French
161
LETTER PAGE
164
To Lady Ossory Jan 15 Verses sent to him by Lady OssoryKirgate
174
To Conway Jan 22 Debate in the House of Lords on Lord Chathams
180
U8D To the same Feb 1 No newsThe Ladies ClubThe Duchess
186
To Mann Feb 15 The gont and the bootikinsPopularity of the
189
VOL vi
193
To Mason April 3 Publication of Masons Life of GrayGrays study
196
To Mann April 17 Politicians and PleasuristsThe American contest
203
To Mason May 7 Criticisms on Masons Memoirs of GraySir Joshua
210
To Mason May 27 With Foxs verses on Mrs CreweFitzpatrick a more
216
LETTBB PAOI
219
To Lady Ossory July 7 His proposed movementsThe Correspondents
225
To Lady Ossory July 23 Confesses his indolenceMr Batemans auction
231
LITTER PAGE
300
To Edward Gibbon Feb Thanks for the first volume of the Decline
306
To the same Feb 29 Burneys History of MusicBraces Travels
313
To Dr Gem April 4 French politiesResistance of the Parliament
320
LETTER PAGE
324
To the same April 23 Same subject
330
To Mason May 14 Masons drawings from Gray
336
To Lord Nuneham May Invitation to Strawberry Hill N
344
LI TTER PAGE
352
To Lady Ossory July 17 He encloses verses by VoltaireMonsieur Hubert
359
To Cole Aug 19 Inquiries after Dr Kenrick PrescotDeath of Mr Damer
367
To Mason Sept 17 Is glad to hear that he is aliveGeneral nowe
373
LETTER PAGE
376
To Mann Oct 13 Successes in AmericaExcellent conduct of Lord Howe
383
To the Earl of Strafford Nov 2 RetirementEffects of our climate
390
To Cole Dec 9 Sir John HawkinssHistory of Music
396
To Lady Ossory no date The thinness of the townSends his poem
403
To Mann Feb 6 Walpoles dislike to the change in mannersDearth
410
To Mason Feb 27 Retirement and love of fameGarrick and Le Texier
417
To Mann April 28 Lord Orfords phrenzyMiserable house in which
432
To Mann June 18 Lord Chathams appearance in the House of Lords
445
To Lady Ossory July 6 The illness of the Duke of GloucesterDistress
450
To Conway July 10 M dAzincourts Histoire de lArt par les Monu
456
To Mason Aug 4 Illnesses of Lord Orford and the Duke of Gloucester
462
To Lord Nuneham Aug 24 The Duke of Gloucesters health much
468
To Cole Aug 31 True wisdomIllness of the Duke ofGIoucerter Monas
471
To Mann Sep 1 The Duke of Gloucesters illnessCapture by General
473
To Cole Sept 22Suggesting a life of Thomas Baker author of Reflec
486
LETTER PAOE
499
To Mason Oct 24 The DelineatorArrival of the Duke and Duchess
505

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 405 - I have often said that this world is a comedy to those who think, a tragedy to those who feel ; and sensibility has not only occasion to suffer for others, but is sure of its own portion too.
Page 437 - Oh that one would hear me! behold, my desire is, that the Almighty would answer me, and that mine adversary had written a book. Surely I would take it upon my shoulder, and bind it as a crown to me.
Page 171 - They hold a Parnassus fair every Thursday, give out rhymes and themes, and all the flux of quality at Bath contend for the prizes. A Roman vase dressed with pink ribbons and myrtles receives the poetry, which is drawn out every festival ; six judges of these Olympic games retire and select the brightest compositions, which the respective successful acknowledge, kneel to Mrs. Calliope Miller, kiss her fat hand, and are crowned by it with myrtle, with — I don't know what.
Page 153 - The next Augustan age will dawn on the other side of the Atlantic. There will, perhaps, be a Thucydides at Boston, a Xenophon at New York, and in time a Virgil at Mexico, and a Newton at Peru. At last some curious traveler from Lima will visit England and give a description of the ruins of St. Paul's...
Page 159 - The Americans at least have acted like men, gone to the bottom at once, and set the whole upon the whole. Our conduct has been that of pert children : we have thrown a pebble at a mastiff, and are surprised it was not frightened.
Page 171 - Yes, on my faith! There are bouts-rimes on a buttered muffin, made by her Grace the Duchess of Northumberland; receipts to make them by Corydon the venerable, alias George Pitt; others very pretty, by Lord Palmerston; some by Lord Carlisle; many by Mrs. Miller herself, that have no fault but wanting metre ; and immortality promised to her without end or measure.
Page 189 - The war with our colonies, which is now declared, is a proof how much influence jargon has on human actions. A war on our own trade is popular ! Both Houses are as eager for it as they were for conquering the Indies — which acquits them a little of rapine, when they are as glad of what will impoverish them as of what they fancied was to enrich them — so like are the great vulgar, and the small.
Page 57 - We have no news public or private ; but there is an ostrich-egg laid in America, where the Bostonians have canted three hundred chests of tea into the ocean, for they will not drink tea with our Parliament. My understanding is so narrow, and was...
Page 29 - ... Garrick has at least the chief hand in it. I never saw anybody in a greater fidget, nor more vain when he returned, for he went to the play-house at half an hour after five, and we sat waiting for him till ten, when he was to act a speech in Cato...
Page 408 - It was circulated with profusion, and, for writing it, the Common Council of London voted the Doctor their thanks, and presented him with the freedom of the city in a gold box.

Bibliographic information