Manual of Cardboard Construction

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order of the Board of Education, Berkeley Reporter, printers, 1908 - Paper work - 32 pages
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Page 7 - ... the experiences he gets outside the school in any complete and free way within the school itself; while, on the other hand, he is unable to apply in daily life what he is learning at school. That is the isolation of the school — its isolation' from life. When the child gets into the schoolroom he has to put out of his mind a large part of the ideas, interests, and activities that predominate in his home and neighborhood.
Page 7 - From the standpoint of the child, the great waste in the school comes from his inability to utilize the experiences he gets outside the school in any complete and free way within the school itself; while, on the other hand, he is unable to apply in daily life what he is learning at school.
Page 7 - ... its isolation from life. When the child gets into the schoolroom he has to put out of his mind a large part of the ideas, interests, and activities that predominate in his home and neighborhood. So the school, being unable to utilize this everyday experience, sets painfully to work, on another tack and by a variety of means, to arouse in the child an interest in school studies.
Page 16 - ... training have split. Accuracy in early childhood is impossible and for this there are many reasons. Looked at from a physical standpoint we know that the large muscles develop first and the smaller ones later in life. Where this is not the case development is not natural. When we lay too much stress on small things we are tearing down rather than building up. The young eye cannot deal with fine measurements and the undeveloped hand can use neither the pencil nor the tool with the necessary skill.
Page 16 - ... School. see it through the eyes of the child. Inaccuracy in hand work is very evident. It is much more noticeable there than anywhere else in school and it must be pointed out. Children will see what is meant for they are dealing with tangible material. Let us be sparing in our criticisms remembering that accuracy is not a characteristic of childhood, and that too much emphasis will have an effect the direct opposite of that intended. 3. The objects made should have some definite connection not...
Page 15 - ... are inherent in childhood. Accuracy is not the keynote of manual training and particularly is this true of the elementary handwork. On this rock of absolute accuracy many systems of manual training have split. Accuracy in early childhood is impossible and for this there are many reasons. Looked at from a physical standpoint we know that the large muscles develop first and the smaller ones later in life. Where this is not the case development is not natural. When we lay too much stress on small...
Page 31 - They should be able to measure any distance accurately and quickly. They should also be familiar with, and know how to construct, squares, rectangles, circles, etc.
Page 15 - ... is not going to be a cure for all problems of inaccuracy which you find in childhood.

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