The Basic Problems of Phenomenology

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Indiana University Press, 1988 - Philosophy - 396 pages
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A lecture course that Martin Heidegger gave in 1927, The Basic Problems of Phenomenology continues and extends explorations begun in Being and Time. In this text, Heidegger provides the general outline of his thinking about the fundamental problems of philosophy, which he treats by means of phenomenology, and which he defines and explains as the basic problem of ontology.

 

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User Review  - thoughtcorner - LibraryThing

This is where Heidegger becomes critical of Being and Time's 'horizions'. This criticism leads directly to his astonishing works of the 30's and 40's. He explicates his criticism of of the estatic ... Read full review

Contents

Exposition and general division of the theme
1
Philosophy as science of being
11
The character of ontological method The three basic components
19
Being Is Not a Real Predicate
27
Phenomenological analysis of the explanation of the concept of being
43
Demonstration of the need for a more fundamental formulation of
49
ceivedness of beings and disclosedness of being
67
Phenomenological clarification of the problem underlying the second
99
3 The forthesakeofwhich Mineness as basis for inau
170
Every Being Regardless of
177
17 Being as copula and the phenomenological problem of assertion
205
18 Assertional truth the idea of truth in general and its relation to
213
The Fundamental Ontological Question
225
20 temporality Zeitlichkeit and Temporality Temporalitdt
274
21 Temporality Temporattat and being
302
22 Being and beings The ontological difference
318

The Basic Ways
122
14 Phenomenological critique of the Kantian solution and demonstra
140
15 The fundamental problem of the multiplicity of ways of being and
154
EDITORS EPILOGUE
331
LEXICON
339
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About the author (1988)

Albert Hofstadter is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His translation of Heidegger's Poetry, Language, Thought received a National Book Award.

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