The Skylark of Space: Skylark Book 1, Book 1

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Orion Publishing Group, Dec 21, 2012 - Fiction - 159 pages

Brilliant government scientist Richard Seaton discovers a remarkable faster-than-light fuel that will power his interstellar spaceship, The Skylark.
His ruthless rival, Marc DuQuesne, and the sinister World Steel Corporation will do anything to get their hands on the fuel.

When they kidnap Seaton's fiancee and friends, they unleash a furious pursuit and ignite a burning desire for revenge that will propel The Skylark across the galaxy and back.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ikeman100 - LibraryThing

Great early Space Opera by one of the genre's best writers of the first half of the 20th century. It's no wonder Frederick Pohl gave Smith such high praise. E.E. Doc Smith was one of the better ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - karamazow - LibraryThing

Er, no. I can stand some amount of clichés, but this is driving things too far. The story is completely unlikely and impossible, without anything in the characters that makes up for it. Too dated for ... Read full review

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About the author (2012)

E. E. 'Doc' Smith (1890 - 1965) Edward Elmer Smith was born in Wisconsin in 1890. He attended the University of Idaho and graduated with degrees in chemical engineering; he went on to attain a PhD in the same subject, and spent his working life as a food engineer. Smith is best known for the 'Skylark' and 'Lensman' series of novels, which are arguably the earliest examples of what a modern audience would recognise as Space Opera. Early novels in both series were serialised in the dominant pulp magazines of the day: Argosy, Amazing Stories, Wonder Stories and a pre-Campbell Astounding, although his most successful works were published under Campbell's editorship. Although he won no major SF awards, Smith was Guest of Honour at the second World Science Fiction Convention in Chicago, in 1940. He died in 1965.

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