Newer Ideals of Peace

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Macmillan, 1906 - Labor - 243 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
31
III
62
IV
93
V
124
VI
151
VII
180
VIII
209
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Page ii - ESSAYS IN THE MONETARY HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. By CHARLES J. BULLOCK, PH.D. SOCIAL CONTROL. By EDWARD A. Ross, PH.D. HISTORY OF POLITICAL PARTIES IN THE UNITED STATES.
Page 45 - Of obedience, faith, adhesiveness ; As I stand aloof and look there is to me something profoundly affecting in large masses of men following the lead of those who do not believe in men.
Page 184 - Because all these things have traditionally been in the hands of women, if they take no part in them now, they are not only missing the education which the natural participation in civic life would bring to them, but they are losing what they have always had. From the beginning of tribal life women have been held responsible for the health of the community...
Page 24 - What we now need to discover in the social realm is the moral equivalent of war : something heroic that will speak to men as universally as war does, and yet will be as compatible with their spiritual selves as war has proved itself to be incompatible.
Page 145 - ... the sole standard in regard to business enterprises and political parties — It is evident that the public intends to call a halt before it Is willing to apply the same standard to labor organizations." An interesting analysis of the growth of unionism and Its moral strength and weaknesses follows: "In a sense It Is fair to hold every institution responsible for the type of man whom It tends to bring to the front, and the type of organization which clings to war methods must, of course, consider...
Page 97 - The United Mine Workers of America is taking men of a score of nationalities, English-speaking and Slav, men of widely different creeds, languages, and customs, and of varying powers of industrial competition, and is welding them into an industrial brotherhood, each part of which can at least understand of the others that they are working for one great and common end. This bond of unionism is stronger than one can readily imagine who has not seen its mysterious workings or who has not been a victim...
Page 47 - ... pendulous shoots quiver and rustle with the lightest breeze, while its roots enfold the rock with a grasp which storms can not loosen ; and America clearly evinces its English origin in this, as in many other ways. Miss Jane Addams, in her Newer ideals of peace, even says : — " In our overweening desire to remain Anglo-Saxon, we have fallen into the Anglo-Saxon temptation of governing all peoples by one standard.
Page 236 - ... fraternal relations with him. All the peoples of the world have become part of our tribunal, and their sense of pity, their clamor for personal kindness, their insistence upon the right to join in our progress, cannot be disregarded. The burdens and sorrows of men have unexpectedly become...
Page 207 - As we believe that woman has no right to allow the things to drop away from her that really belong to her, so we contend that ability to perform an obligation comes very largely in proportion as that obligation is conscientiously assumed.
Page 183 - ... may we not say that city housekeeping has failed partly because women, the traditional housekeepers, have not been consulted as to its multiform activities?

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