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User Review  - ted_newell - LibraryThing

Tough sledding but worth it. Rousseau is grandfather or even father of historicism, a true revolutionary. Now human history is us making ourselves, we think. My take is in my book Five Paradigms. Read full review

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User Review  - hbergander - LibraryThing

I am still fascinated by this book concerning the negative attitude, Rousseau adopts against his pupil in the question, how to deal with sexuality. The philosopher seems to be an early apologist of a repression which later on was generalised in the Victorianism. Read full review

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User Review  - rmolden - LibraryThing

Great book covering Rousseau's educational views. I don't know if I can support everything he suggests. Following his advice could conceivably either result in a genius or someone incapable of the ... Read full review

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asslam o alkum g

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Its is a hypothetical character (a fictional child) orphan that Rousseau uses for grounds to base a philosophical education best described as child-centered progressive education. This type of education is largely "centered" around the child's learning capacity, their enviroment and how to explain adult ideas, through examples in the child's world. But its more than that, it also teach us about ourselves. It explains why every government that has ever existed, has educated its people to be nothing more than workers. Living for nothing more than to serve other, and live a meaningless existence. Below is a exerp for Emile: "Good social instutions are those best fitted to make a man un-natural, to exchange his independence for dependence, to merge the unit into the group, so that he no longer regards himself as one, but as part of the whole." he continues "He who would preserve the supremacy of natural feelings in social life knows not what he asks. Ever at war with himself, hesitating between his wishes and his duties, he will be neither man nor citizen. He will be of no use to himself nor to others. He will be a man of our day, a Frenchman, a Englishman, one of the great middle class." In the end though, it appears that Rousseau considers only one type of education to be the right path. "There remains the education of the home or of nature; but how will man live with others if he is to be educated for himself alone? If the twofold aim could be resolved into one by removing the man's self contradiction, one great obstacle to his happiness would be gone. To judge of this you must see the man full-grown; you must have noted his inclinations, watched his progress, followed his steps; in a word you must really know a natural man. When you have read this work, I think you will made some progress into this inquiry."  


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