Secret Proceedings and Debates of the Convention Assembled at Philadelphia, in the 1787,: For the Purpose of Forming the Constitution of the United States of America

Front Cover
A. Mygatt, 1838 - Constitutional conventions - 335 pages
0 Reviews

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 286 - of Congress, become the seat of government of the United States; and to exercise like authority over all places purchased by the consent of the legislature of the State in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and other needful buildings ; and To make all laws which shall
Page 297 - that it is the opinion of this convention, that it should afterwards be submitted to a convention of delegates chosen in each State by the people thereof, under the recommendation of its legislature, for their assent and ratification; and that each convention assenting to, and ratifying the same, shall
Page 289 - votes of the electors, shall be the Vice-President. But, if there should remain two or more who have equal votes, the Senate shall choose from them by ballot, the VicePresident. The Congress may determine the time of
Page 104 - That each branch ought to possess the right of originating acts." Agreed to. " That the national legislature ought to be empowered to enjoy the legislative rights vested in Congress by the confederation." Agreed to. " And, moreover, to legislate in all cases to which the separate States are incompetent.
Page 102 - confederation, namely, common defence, security of liberty, and general welfare. " 2. Resolved, That no treaty or treaties among any of the States, as sovereign, will accomplish or secure their common defence, liberty, or welfare. " 3. Resolved, That a national government ought to be established, consisting of a supreme judicial, legislative, and executive." In considering the question on the first resolve,
Page 259 - 19. Resolved, That the amendments which shall be offered to the confederation by the convention, ought, at a proper time or times, after the approbation of Congress, to be submitted to an assembly or assemblies of representatives, recommended by the several legislatures, to be expressly chosen by the people to consider and decide thereon. RESOLUTIONS
Page 296 - Roger Sherman. NEW YORK. Alexander Hamilton. NEW JERSEY. William Livingston, David Brearley, William Patterson, Jonathan Dayton. PENNSYLVANIA. Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Mifflin, Robert Morris, George Clymer, Thomas Fitzsimons, Jared Ingersoll, James Wilson, Gouverneur Morris. DELAWARE. George Read, Gunning Bedford, Jun.
Page 296 - IN CONVENTION, Monday, September 17th, 1787. PRESENT, The States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Mr. Hamilton from New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia: Resolved, That the preceding Constitution be laid before the United States in Congress assembled,
Page 8 - of government, territory, or otherwise, with the consent of a number of voices in the national legislature less than the whole. •' 15. Resolved, That provision ought to be made for the continuance of Congress, and their authority and privileges, until a given day after the reform of the articles of union shall be adopted, and for the
Page 9 - 19. That the amendments which shall be offered to the confederation by this convention, ought, at a proper time or times, after the approbation of Congress, to be submitted to an assembly or assemblies, recommended by the legislatures, to be expressly chosen by the people, to consider and decide thereon.

Bibliographic information