Sociology and Social Progress: A Handbook for Students of Sociology

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Thomas Nixon Carver
Ginn, 1905 - Sociology - 810 pages
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Page 373 - But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her, for her hair is given her for a covering.
Page 593 - For the loving worm within its clod, Were diviner than a loveless god Amid his worlds, I will dare to say.
Page 473 - When we see a stroke aimed and just ready to fall upon the leg or arm of another person, we naturally shrink and draw back our own leg or our own arm...
Page 789 - As soon as any part of a person's conduct affects prejudicially the interests of others, society has jurisdiction over it, and the question whether the general welfare will or will not be promoted by interfering with it, becomes open to discussion.
Page 472 - How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it.
Page 473 - By the imagination we place ourselves in his situation, we conceive ourselves enduring all the same torments, we enter as it were into his body, and become in some measure the same person with him, and thence form some idea of his sensations, and even feel something which, though weaker in degree, is not altogether unlike them.
Page 486 - Kidd then defines religion as being "a form of belief providing an ultra-rational sanction for that large class of conduct in the individual where his interests and the interests of the social organism are antagonistic, and by which the former are rendered subordinate to the latter in the general interest of the evolution which the race is undergoing," and says that we have here the principle at the base of all religions.
Page 610 - ... those communities, which included the greatest number of the most sympathetic members, would flourish best, and rear the greatest number of offspring.
Page 389 - Man scans with scrupulous care the character and pedigree of his horses, cattle, and dogs before he matches them ; but when he comes to his own marriage he rarely or never takes any such care.
Page 535 - In no country, perhaps, in the world is the law so general a study. The profession itself is numerous and powerful, and in most provinces it takes the lead. The greater number of the deputies sent to the congress were lawyers. But all who read, and most do read, endeavor to obtain some smattering in that science.

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